Letters from the Palazzo Barbaro by Henry James

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Writing with an impressionistic immediacy and familiarity of tone, he conveys the breadth of his experience with all of his powers of psychological shading, and none of his usual restraint.
-Guardian

Synopsis

HENRY JAMES first came to Venice as a tourist and instantly fell in love with the city - particularly with the splendid Palazzo Barbaro, home of the expatriate American Curtis family. This selection of letters covers the period 1869-1907 and provides a unique record of the life and work of this great writer. Includes historical photographs and a foreword by Leon Edel, Henry James's biographer
 

About Henry James

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Henry James (1843-1916), born in New York City, was the son of noted religious philosopher Henry James, Sr., and brother of eminent psychologist and philosopher William James. He spent his early life in America and studied in Geneva, London and Paris during his adolescence to gain the worldly experience so prized by his father. He lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard Law School, and in 1864 began to contribute both criticism and tales to magazines. In 1869, and then in 1872-74, he paid visits to Europe and began his first novel, Roderick Hudson. Late in 1875 he settled in Paris, where he met Turgenev, Flaubert, and Zola, and wrote The American (1877). In December 1876 he moved to London, where two years later he achieved international fame with Daisy Miller. Other famous works include Washington Square (1880), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Princess Casamassima (1886), The Aspern Papers (1888), The Turn of the Screw (1898), and three large novels of the new century, The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903) and The Golden Bowl (1904). In 1905 he revisited the United States and wrote The American Scene (1907). During his career he also wrote many works of criticism and travel. Although old and ailing, he threw himself into war work in 1914, and in 1915, a few months before his death, he became a British subject. In 1916 King George V conferred the Order of Merit on him. He died in London in February 1916.
 
Published January 1, 1998 by Pushkin Press. 224 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Travel, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Letters from the Palazzo Barbaro
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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Ivan Juritz on Jun 08 2013

The collection is padded out with various commentaries intended to place the letters historically. Too often, they bring to bear a context from which James wilfully removed himself.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Ivan Juritz on Jun 09 2013

Writing with an impressionistic immediacy and familiarity of tone, he conveys the breadth of his experience with all of his powers of psychological shading, and none of his usual restraint.

Read Full Review of Letters from the Palazzo Barbaro | See more reviews from Guardian

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