Lilith, A Romance by George MacDonald

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Synopsis

"Lilith is equal if not superior to the best of Poe," raved poet W. H. Auden about this classic Victorian novel. Known as the father of fantasy literature, George MacDonald was a Scottish minister who later turned to writing poetry and novels, gaining acclaim for his children's books and influencing J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis. Lilith is considered to be one of the most important visionary novels of the nineteenth century.
Written in 1895, Lilith is a fantasy novel for adults that's rich with symbolism and suspense. A recent heir to his parents' English country manor, Mr. Vane has been troubled by visions of an elderly gentleman in his library. Curious, he follows the old man through a passageway and discovers a dusty mirror that leads him on a spiritual journey into another world. As he travels through time in scenes that range from the beautiful to the grotesque, he encounters a series of mysteries that reveal a deeper reality. Is Vane dreaming . . . or going mad? With classic themes of good and evil, identity and free will, suffering and salvation, Lilith is a thought-provoking, sometimes puzzling, allegory that will challenge your intellect and stay with you long after the last page is turned.
 

About George MacDonald

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George MacDonald, December 10, 1824 - September 18. 1905 George MacDonald was born on December 10, 1824 in Huntley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He attended University in Aberdeen in 1840 and then went on to Highbury College in 1848 where he studied to be a Congregational Minister, receiving his M. A. His first appointment was in Arundel, but he was forced to resign form the position in 1853. He became a lecturer in English Literature at Kings College in London before finally focusing all of his attention on writing and living off the charity of friends and pupils. In 1955, MacDonald wrote his first important original work, a long religious poem entitled "Within and Without." Three years later in 1858, he wrote "Phantastes," his first contribution to the fantasy genre. It was influenced by both the English and Germanic Romantic writers and religious poets of the Renaissance. MacDonald is perhaps best known for his fantasy children's books, although he wrote fantasy books for adults as well. His most well known children's book is "At the Back of the North Wind," which was surprisingly a favorite of Mark Twain's children. In 1863, MacDonald published "David Eiginbrod, the first of a dozen novels that were set in Scotland and based on the lives of rural Scots. It was these series of novels that gained MacDonald worldwide fame and brought money to the foundering MacDonald family. MacDonald was a friend and confident of Lewis Carroll and John Ruskin. He exchanged letters with Mark Twain, and met Walt Whitman and many other American writers on his trips to America. MacDonald also inspired his later compatriots, such as C. S. Lewis, with his blend of fantasy and Christianity. George MacDonald died in Ashtead, Surrey, England, on September 18. 1905. His body is buried in Bordighea, Italy, a place he spent most of his later years in.
 
Published May 12, 2012 by London: Chatto & Windus,. 286 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Romance, Education & Reference, History, Religion & Spirituality, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Children's Books, Action & Adventure, Travel. Non-fiction

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