Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
(Signet Classics)

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Synopsis

Little Women is one of the best loved books of all time. Lovely Meg, talented Jo, frail Beth, spoiled Amy: these are hard lessons of poverty and of growing up in New England during the Civil War. Through their dreams, plays, pranks, letters, illnesses, and courtships, women of all ages have become a part of this remarkable family and have felt the deep sadness when Meg leaves the circle of sisters to be married at the end of Part I. Part II, chronicles Meg's joys and mishaps as a young wife and mother, Jo's struggle to become a writer, Beth's tragedy, and Amy's artistic pursuits and unexpected romance. Based on Louisa May Alcott's childhood, this lively portrait of nineteenth- century family life possesses a lasting vitality that has endeared it to generations of readers.
 

About Louisa May Alcott

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Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.
 
Published January 1, 1989 by Penguin Classic. 544 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Children's Books, History, Education & Reference, Self Help, Romance, Action & Adventure, Humor & Entertainment, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Parenting & Relationships, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Little Women

The New York Times

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The Library of America edition replaces the familiar 1880 text of "Little Women" with the pluckier original. What took everybody so long?

May 15 2005 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Book Reporter

"THE LITTLE WOMEN LETTERS takes one of the enduring classics of American literature and uses it to concoct a fun and meaningful story about how the past can help us all find our way into the future."

Aug 25 2011 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Entertainment Weekly

You've never seen any of the previous movie adaptations, either, but you've recently fallen in love with… Louisa May Alcott Fiction Historical Fiction Book Review...

Jan 13 1995 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Common Sense Media

Once you read Little Women, you'll have to read all the sequels and, like me, you'll go through a major Alcott stage and start crazily reading all her books.

| Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Common Sense Media

Once you read Little Women, you'll have to read all the sequels and, like me, you'll go through a major Alcott stage and start crazily reading all her books.

| Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Open Book Society

In this uncensored version, the March girls learn some biting lessons, transforming from wild girls into little women—just as their friends and neighbors transform into vicious, bloodthirsty werewolves!

Jan 19 2011 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Nerdist

As opposed to the other books I’ve picked up in this new sub-genre, Grand does a lot of editing of the original text instead of haphazardly injecting her own werewolf theme alongside it, and it’s not a bad thing.

Jul 09 2010 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

The Times of India

Those who love the Little Women, the timeless classic by Louisa May Alcott will love this book, Little Women and Me by Lauren Baratz-Logstead, which takes all kinds of liberties with the original story.

Apr 27 2013 | Read Full Review of Little Women (Signet Classics)

Reader Rating for Little Women
85%

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