Living Color by Nina G. Jablonski
The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment.

Richly illustrated, this book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning— a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history—including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.

 

About Nina G. Jablonski

See more books from this Author
Nina G. Jablonski is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University. She is the author of Skin: A Natural History, (UC Press), and was named one of the first Alphonse Fletcher, Sr. Fellows for her efforts to improve the public understanding of skin color.
 
Published September 27, 2012 by University of California Press. 267 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Living Color

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

“Children begin to attribute significance to skin color at about three years of age,” observes anthropologist Jablonski (Skin: A Natural History). “But,” she continues, “they don’t develop ideas of ra

Jul 30 2012 | Read Full Review of Living Color: The Biological ...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

“Children begin to attribute significance to skin color at about three years of age,” observes anthropologist Jablonski (Skin: A Natural History). “But,” she continues, “they don’t develop ideas of ra

Jul 30 2012 | Read Full Review of Living Color: The Biological ...

Reader Rating for Living Color
92%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 10 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×