MAIN STREET BLUES by RICHARD O. DAVIES
THE DECLINE OF SMALL-TOWN AMERICA (URBAN LIFE & URBAN LANDSCAPE)

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Synopsis

Richard O. Davies takes the reader through two hundred years of American history as reflected in the small Ohio farming village of Camden. Davies describes the development of the relatively self-sufficient community that emerged from the Ohio land rush of the early nineteenth century, a community that reached its apex during the 1920s and then entered into a period of slow decline caused by forces beyond its control. He details the roles of land speculation, the railroad era, the impact of the automobile, the emergence of a tightly knit community, and finally the post-World War II loss of business and population to the nearby cities of Dayton, Hamilton, and Cincinnati.
 

About RICHARD O. DAVIES

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Richard O. Davies is University Foundation Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the author or editor of twelve books, including "America's Obsession: Sports and Society Since 1945" (1994), and "Main Street Blues: The Decline of Small-Town America" (1998), which was named one of the top 25 books in American History by "Choice," Although his publications range widely over the history of twentieth-century American history, he has in the past decade established himself as one of the leading scholars in the growing field of American sports history.
 
Published July 1, 1998 by Ohio State University Press. 256 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

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The author, a history professor now residing in Nevada, grew up in Camden, Ohio, and left his home town after graduating from high school in 1960.

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