MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood
A Novel

73%

14 Critic Reviews

MaddAddam is slightly crazed, usually intriguing and often great fun. I would have enjoyed it even more, however, were it not for the nagging voice that said: instead of this, we might have had another Alias Grace, or another The Blind Assassin.
-Guardian

Synopsis

A New York Times Notable Book
A Washington Post Notable Book
A Best Book of the Year: The Guardian, NPR, The Christian Science Monitor, The Globe and Mail
A GoodReads Reader's Choice

Bringing together Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood, this thrilling conclusion to Margaret Atwood's speculative fiction trilogy points toward the ultimate endurance of community, and love.

Months after the Waterless Flood pandemic has wiped out most of humanity, Toby and Ren have rescued their friend Amanda from the vicious Painballers. They return to the MaddAddamite cob house, newly fortified against man and giant pigoon alike. Accompanying them are the Crakers, the gentle, quasi-human species engineered by the brilliant but deceased Crake. Their reluctant prophet, Snowman-the-Jimmy, is recovering from a debilitating fever, so it's left to Toby to preach the Craker theology, with Crake as Creator. She must also deal with cultural misunderstandings, terrible coffee, and her jealousy over her lover, Zeb.

Zeb has been searching for Adam One, founder of the God's Gardeners, the pacifist green religion from which Zeb broke years ago to lead the MaddAddamites in active resistance against the destructive CorpSeCorps. But now, under threat of a Painballer attack, the MaddAddamites must fight back with the aid of their newfound allies, some of whom have four trotters. At the center of MaddAddam is the story of Zeb's dark and twisted past, which contains a lost brother, a hidden murder, a bear, and a bizarre act of revenge.

Combining adventure, humor, romance, superb storytelling, and an imagination at once dazzlingly inventive and grounded in a recognizable world, MaddAddam is vintage Margaret Atwood—a moving and dramatic conclusion to her internationally celebrated dystopian trilogy.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Margaret Atwood

See more books from this Author
Born November 18, 1939, in Ottawa, Canada, Margaret Atwood spent her early years in the northern Quebec wilderness. Settling in Toronto in 1946, she continued to spend summers in the northern woods. This experience provided much of the thematic material for her verse. She began her writing career as a poet, short story writer, cartoonist, and reviewer for her high school paper. She received a B.A. from Victoria College, University of Toronto in 1961 and an M.A. from Radcliff College in 1962. Atwood's first book of verse, Double Persephone, was published in 1961 and was awarded the E. J. Pratt Medal. She has published numerous books of poetry, novels, story collections, critical work, juvenile work, and radio and teleplays. Her works include The Journals of Susanna Moodie (1970), Power Politics (1971), Cat's Eye (1986), The Robber Bride (1993), Morning in the Buried House (1995), and Alias Grace (1996). Many of her works focus on women's issues. She has won numerous awards for her poetry and fiction including the Prince of Asturias award for Literature, the Booker Prize, the Governor General's Award in 1966 for The Circle Game and in 1986 for The Handmaid's Tale, which also won the very first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987.
 
Published September 3, 2013 by Nan A. Talese. 394 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Action & Adventure, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for MaddAddam
All: 14 | Positive: 10 | Negative: 4

Kirkus

Above average
on Jul 07 2013

By no means her finest work, but Atwood remains an expert thinker about human foibles and how they might play out on a grand scale.

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Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Jun 10 2013

Her vision is as affirming as it is cautionary, and the conclusion of this remarkable trilogy leaves us not with a sense of despair at mankind’s failings but with a sense of awe at humanity’s barely explored potential to evolve.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Andrew Sean Greer on Sep 06 2013

Like its predecessors, “MaddAddam” is as much a story of adolescent longing and disappointment as it is of life before and after the Waterless Flood.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Theo Tait on Aug 28 2013

MaddAddam is slightly crazed, usually intriguing and often great fun. I would have enjoyed it even more, however, were it not for the nagging voice that said: instead of this, we might have had another Alias Grace, or another The Blind Assassin.

Read Full Review of MaddAddam: A Novel | See more reviews from Guardian

Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Jun 10 2013

Her vision is as affirming as it is cautionary, and the conclusion of this remarkable trilogy leaves us not with a sense of despair at mankind’s failings but with a sense of awe at humanity’s barely explored potential to evolve.

Read Full Review of MaddAddam: A Novel | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Blog Critics

Above average
Reviewed by Magdalena Ball on Jul 23 2013

Although each book stands alone reasonably well, this third one definitely requires the detailed overview of the other two in order to place it in the right context. As with the other two books in the trilogy, Maddaddam is full of inventive and blackly humorous details about the world of the future...

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WSJ online

Good
Reviewed by Tom Shippey on Sep 05 2013

"MaddAddam" is at once a pre- and a post-apocalypse story, the best in that line since Thomas Disch's post-AIDS plague story, "The M.D." (1991). And the tragicomic blend works as well as Ursula Le Guin's "The New Atlantis"...

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NPR

Good
Reviewed by Annalee Newitz on Sep 13 2013

Thoughtful, sardonic, and full of touches that almost resemble a fairy tale, MaddAddam will stick with you long after you've put it down.

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Star Tribune

Good
Reviewed by Ellen Akins on Aug 31 2013

There is something funny, even endearing, about such a dark and desperate view of a future — a ravaged world emerging from alarmingly familiar trends — that is so jam-packed with the gifts of imagination, invention, intelligence and joy.

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LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Carolyn Kellogg on Aug 29 2013

After thousands of pages of complex world-building, readers may be expecting a whiz-bang finale, something Atwood does not build into "MaddAddam." In fact, her storytelling choices and strategies leave "MaddAddam" feeling less urgent than the earlier novels. Characters that were once resourceful and desperate to survive now mill and mope.

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Toronto Star

Above average
Reviewed by Jennifer Hunter on Aug 27 2013

But despite the chaos that threatens to destroy life, love survives. For the concluding novel is, above all, a story of the growing bond between the ever patient Toby and Zeb...The couple plays a crucial role in the hope of the new genesis. We are grateful for the romance, for all the wild puns and the more comic elements of the dark satire.

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AV Club

Above average
Reviewed by Tasha Robinson on Sep 09 2013

It feels like this trilogy might be best read in reverse order of publication, since the series’ key mysteries are revealed by the end of the first book, defanging everything that comes afterward.

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National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Jeet Heer on Aug 30 2013

Atwood’s ability to get us to care for Toby’s fate is what redeems the trilogy in the end, giving it emotional gravity that was previously missing.

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National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Jeet Heer on Aug 30 2013

Yet the MaddAddam books aren’t without flaw. One major problem is that Atwood relies heavily on coincidences, with her small cast of characters constantly running into each other both before and after the catastrophe...Thanks to Toby, the trilogy gains that human dimension which only the best fiction possesses.

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Malinda Charter

Malinda Charter 22 Jul 2014

Added the book to custom list '2013 NPR'

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