Many Moons by James Thurber
(Books for Young Readers)

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Synopsis

A wise tale of a little princess who wanted the moon and got it. “Grown-ups themselves will find the book hilariously funny. . . . The lovely, squiggly illustrations in color are exactly right.”--The New Yorker
 

About James Thurber

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Born in Columbus, Ohio, Thurber was blinded in one eye in a childhood accident. He attended Ohio State University but left without earning a degree. In 1925 he moved to New York City, where he joined the staff of the New Yorker in 1927 at the urging of his friend E. B. White. For the rest of his lifetime, Thurber contributed to the magazine his highly individual pieces and those strange, wry, and disturbing pen-and-ink drawings of "huge, resigned dogs, the determined and sometimes frightening women, the globular men who try so hard to think so unsuccessfully." The period from 1925, when the New Yorker was founded, until the death of its creator-editor, Harold Ross, in 1951, was described by Thurber in delicious and absorbing detail in The Years with Ross (1959). Of his two great talents, Thurber preferred to think of himself primarily as a writer, illustrating his own books. He published "fables" in the style of Aesop (see Vol. 2) and La Fontaine (see Vol. 2)---usually with a "barbed tip of contemporary significance"---children's books, several plays (two Broadway hits, one successful musical revue), and endless satires and parodies in short stories or full-length works. "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," included in My World---and Welcome to It (1942), is probably his best-known story and continues to be frequently anthologized. T. S. Eliot described Thurber's work as "a form of humor which is also a way of saying something serious. No Bio
 
Published January 1, 1970 by Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich. 48 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Many Moons

Kirkus Reviews

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The 1944 Caldecott winner is delightfully reillustrated by another Caldecott medalist.

Sep 01 1990 | Read Full Review of Many Moons (Books for Young R...

Kirkus Reviews

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May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Many Moons (Books for Young R...

Publishers Weekly

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Buoyant watercolors, full of poignancy and subtle merriment, more than do justice to Thurber's beloved tale of a princess who asks for the moon, and the wise jester who presents her with it, said

Aug 31 1998 | Read Full Review of Many Moons (Books for Young R...

Publishers Weekly

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""Buoyant watercolors, full of poignancy and subtle merriment, more than do justice to Thurber's beloved tale of a princess who asks for the moon, and the wise jester who presents her with it,"" said PW.

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Los Angeles Times

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Chorpenning, it's playing at the Orange County Performing Arts Center's Founders Hall, performed by South Coast Repertory's Young Conservatory Players.

Mar 10 1989 | Read Full Review of Many Moons (Books for Young R...

Common Sense Media

The jester leaps into the king's presence, the king eloquently frowns at the royal mathematician's swarm of equations, and the princess assesses the moon as she stands in a shadow.

Oct 08 2012 | Read Full Review of Many Moons (Books for Young R...

Kepler's

The Royal Wizard claims the moon is made of green cheese and that he can fetch gold from the rainbow but he cannot pull the moon from the sky.

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Reader Rating for Many Moons
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