Marcella Cucina by Marcella Hazan

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Synopsis

Since the publication of her first book, The Classic Italian Cookbook, more than 20 years ago, Marcella Hazan has been hailed as the queen of Italian cooking in America. Marcella, whose name conjures up a splendid world of food for the devoted millions who love her books and attend her cooking classes, is back again with her finest book yet, Marcella Cucina. Filled with the passion and personality of its author, it is a book not only of fine food and its careful preparation but of personal reminiscences and penetrating commentary about the sensual pleasure of food and its place in our lives.

In vivid introductory essays and seductive headnotes, the narrative of an extraordinary culinary life unfolds. With each memory of a trip, a meal or a flavor, we are treated to the perspective of a great cook and teacher--one who believes that the finest Italian cooking is found in the home. In Marcella Cucina, she focuses on regional cooking, turning her sharp eye to every area of Italy and offering a rich array of flavors and textures from cities and villages alike. Best of all, Marcella cooks at your side with easy-to-follow instructions and lavish full-color photographs that teach you her techniques--from preparing homemade pasta to cleaning artichokes--and allow you flawlessly to re-create her magic in your own kitchen.

 

About Marcella Hazan

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Marcella Hazan was the acknowledged godmother of Italian cooking in America. The recipient of two Lifetime Achievement Awards (from the James Beard Foundation in 2000 and the IACP in 2004), she was the author of many classic cookbooks, including Marcella Says… and Marcella Cucina.
 
Published August 19, 1997 by HarperCollins. 480 pages
Genres: Cooking. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Marcella Cucina

The New York Times

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behind the note that Marcella appends — “In the classic Caprese there is no vinegar, but Victor insists it is a required part of the juices in his version” — you can practically see the traditionalist rolling her eyes.

Oct 03 2008 | Read Full Review of Marcella Cucina

Publishers Weekly

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In the language of cookbooks, the word ``classic'' is bandied about nearly as frequently as the terms ``low-fat'' and ``no-cholesterol.'' In this case, however, the estimable Hazan ( More Classic Italian Cooking ) does indeed contribute a classic to the ever-increasing literature of Italian cuisine.

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Publishers Weekly

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In 1969 Hazan gave the private cooking class that launched her career as the Italian Julia Child.

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Publishers Weekly

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Thus, as readers progress through this work, they'll feel Hazan's censorious presence as they wonder, for example, if they can skip blanching and proceed directly to sautéing rapini, but they'll learn a lot if they can overlook her occasionally blunt manner ("The unbalanced use of garlic is the s...

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Publishers Weekly

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Not surprisingly, the chapter on pasta is a standout, with such wonders as Goat Cheese, Chive, and Chili Pepper Sauce for Pasta and the simple Savoy Cabbage and Sausage Pasta Sauce.

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