Mary Louise by L. Frank (Lyman Frank) Baum

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews


“It’s positively cruel!” pouted Jennie Allen, one of a group of girls occupying a garden bench in the ample grounds of Miss Stearne’s School for Girls, at Beverly.

“It’s worse than that; it’s insulting,” declared Mable Westervelt, her big dark eyes flashing indignantly.

“Doesn’t it seem to reflect on our characters?” timidly asked Dorothy Knerr.

“Indeed it does!” asserted Sue Finley. “But here comes Mary Louise; let’s ask her opinion.”

“Phoo! Mary Louise is only a day scholar,” said Jennie. “The restriction doesn’t apply to her at all.”

“I’d like to hear what she says, anyhow,” remarked Dorothy. “Mary Louise has a way of untangling things, you know.”

“She’s rather too officious to suit me,” Mable Westervelt retorted, “and she’s younger than any of us. One would think, the way she poses as monitor at this second-rate, run-down boarding school, that Mary Louise Burrows made the world.”

“Oh, Mable! I’ve never known her to pose at all,” said Sue. “But, hush; she mustn’t overhear us and, besides, if we want her to intercede with Miss Stearne we must not offend her.”

Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author of children's books, best known for writing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works (55 novels in total (plus four "lost" novels), 82 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings), and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen.

Published by Allen Suss 

About L. Frank (Lyman Frank) Baum

See more books from this Author
Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored. Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.
Published May 16, 2012 281 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Action & Adventure. Fiction

Rate this book!

Add Review