Master of the Three Ways by Hung Ying-Ming

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 8 Critic Reviews

Railsea feels almost like it does belong on a ‘boy’s own adventure’ shelf with Robert Louis Reviews Stevenson books, but of course, in China Mieville’s deft hands, its appeal is much wider, and its ideas greater and stranger.
-Mutiny Zine

Synopsis

At once profound, spiritual, and witty, Master of the Three Ways is a remarkable work about human nature, the essence of life, and how to live simply and with awareness. In three hundred and fifty-seven verses, the author, Hung Ying-ming—a seventeenth-century Chinese sage—explores good and evil, honesty and deception, wisdom and foolishness, and heaven and hell. He draws from the wisdom of the “Three Creeds”—Taoism, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism—to impress upon us that by combining simple elegance with the ordinary, we can make our lives artistic and poetic. This sense, along with a particular understanding of Zen that makes art from the simple in everyday life, has permeated Chinese and Japanese culture to this day.

The work is divided into two books. The first generally deals with the art of living in society and the second is concerned with man's solitude and contemplations of nature. These themes repeatedly spill over into each other, creating multiple levels of meaning.

 

About Hung Ying-Ming

See more books from this Author
WILLIAM SCOTT WILSON is the foremost translator into English of traditional Japanese texts on samurai culture. He received BA degrees from Dartmouth College and the Monterey Institute of Foreign Studies, and an MA in Japanese literary studies from the University of Washington. His best-selling translations include Hagakure, The Book of Five Rings, The Unfettered Mind, Taiko, and Ideals of the Samurai. He is also the author of The Lone Samurai, a biography of the legendary samurai Miyamoto Musashi.


Author Residence: Miami, Florida


Author Hometown: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
 
Published May 15, 2012 by Shambhala Publications. 224 pages
Genres: Religion & Spirituality, Law & Philosophy.
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Master of the Three Ways
All: 8 | Positive: 8 | Negative: 0

Publishers Weekly

Excellent
Apr 09 2012

Working variations on such classics as Moby-Dick, Robinson Crusoe, and A Wizard of Earthsea, this massively imaginative and frequently playful novel features eccentric characters, amazing monsters, and, at its heart, an intense sense of wonder.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Fiction Reviews

Excellent
Reviewed by Ian Hunter

Clever, funny, exciting, action-packed, jam-packed with a great original worldview, vivid descriptions ...combined with a typically Miévillian narrative style, but what the heck, this is a story, a yarn, just sit back and enjoy a bumpy, thrills and spills ride

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Fantasy Book Review

Good
Reviewed by Brian Herstig

Railsea is a great book that has the potential to be the kind of classic that others will mimic – like Dune and Moby Dick before it.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Reader Dad

Good
Reviewed by Matt on May 29 2012

Over the past number of years, Miéville has become something of a poster boy for science fiction, and consistently produces some of the finest work in the genre. His latest is a wonderful showcase for an imagination that knows no bounds and has few equals.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

The Little Red Reviewer Blog

Good
Jun 03 2012

Because this is a Mieville, the actual plot is just the tip of the iceberg. Under the waterline is the pandora’s box of the language itself...Mieville surrounds us with his environments instead of just describing them.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Bibliophilia

Good
Reviewed by Maggie Desmond-O'Brien on Jun 19 2012

Riveting, clever, and gorgeously realized, this salty sci-fi ferronautical tale is one of the best novels I've read so far this year, YA or otherwise. Not to be missed.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Bunbury in the Stacks

Good
Reviewed by Heidi on May 15 2012

Railsea is ridiculous, but the respect and authority that Miéville gives to his characters in the story therein left me completely enraptured, enamored, and on the edge of my seat wanting more. To me, Railsea was hilarious.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Mutiny Zine

Good
Aug 18 2012

Railsea feels almost like it does belong on a ‘boy’s own adventure’ shelf with Robert Louis Reviews Stevenson books, but of course, in China Mieville’s deft hands, its appeal is much wider, and its ideas greater and stranger.

Read Full Review of Master of the Three Ways

Reader Rating for Master of the Three Ways
90%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 10 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×