Matisse Picasso by Henri Matisse

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Synopsis

Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso have long been seen as the twin giants of modern art, as polar opposites but also as complementary figures. Between them they are the originators of many of the most significant innovations of 20th-century painting and sculpture, but their relationship has rarely been explored in all of its closeness and complexity. In spite of their initial rivalry, the two masters eventually acknowledged one another as equals, becoming, in their old age, increasingly important to one another both artistically and personally. From the time of their initial encounters in 1906 in Gertrude and Leo Stein's Paris studio until 1917, they individually produced some of the greatest art of the 20th century and maintained an openly competitive relationship brimming with intense innovation. This period saw them create such works as Picasso's majestic "Woman with a Fan" of 1908 and Matisse's great portrait of his wife of 1913. Matisse responds to Synthetic Cubism in his "Piano Lesson" of 1916 and Picasso comes back in turn with a new, more decorative Cubism in "Three Musicians" of 1921. The 20s saw them grow apart, as Matisse moved from Paris to Nice and Picasso became involved with the Surrealists, but the 30s brought them together again, through their sheer fame and devotion to reality-based art. Their story continues until Matisse's death in 1954, when Picasso paid his friend and colleague tribute in his series Women of Algiers, of which he said, "When Matisse died, he left his odalisques to me as a legacy." Matisse Picasso presents the artists' oeuvres in groupings that reveal the affinities but also the extreme contrasts of their artistic visions. Published to accompany the landmark exhibition, a joint effort of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Tate Modern, London; the Raunion des musaes nationaux/Musae Picasso and the Musae national d'art moderne/Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Matisse Picasso is the first major examination of the fascinating relationships between their art, their careers, and their lives. Thirty-four essays, each by a member of the exhibition's curatorial team, focus on a particular moment in the artists' evolving relationship. The authors present in-depth analyses of specific aspects of the unique artistic dialogue between Matisse and Picasso as reflected in selected juxtapositions of each artist's works. These texts are accompanied by an introductory history, commentary on the public perception of important artistic relationships, and an extensive chronology.
 

About Henri Matisse

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Published January 1, 2002 by Museum of Modern Art. 368 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Matisse Picasso

The New York Times

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Picasso also began to work with sawn and painted plywood, and in 1962 he worked with metal cutouts, bent and painted with multiple colors on both sides.

May 02 2003 | Read Full Review of Matisse Picasso

Publishers Weekly

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Five large square board books now being published by Pelican (previously published by Budding Artists Inc.) feature child-friendly works by acclaimed artists as part of the Great Art for Kids series, edited by Margaret E.

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Publishers Weekly

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While the book has not been re-set, and its newspaper column-like typestting looks boxy and old-fashioned in the age of Quark and Photoshop, the font and lay-out seem appropriate to this book's old-school ""appreciation"" approach-Schneider starts with particular works, and lets them guide his ob...

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Publishers Weekly

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Timed to coincide roughly with the opening of the blockbuster Matisse-Picasso exhibition's third and final stop, at New York's MoMA QNS (February–May), this volume examines the enmity and amity between the 20th century's two greatest painters, mostly as evidenced by their art.

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Publishers Weekly

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Founder of the art journal L'OEil , which she edited until 1969, she was a friend and associate of many famous artists, including the trio profiled in this snazzily illustrated book, replete with 350 reproductions and photographs (200 in color), and based on her lectures at New York's Metropolita...

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Publishers Weekly

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Matisse's Le bonheur de vivre (1905–6) cemented itself in Picasso's mind from their first meeting, and would "reverberate in Picasso's imagination throughout his life," writes Golding.

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Examiner

It's difficult to say which is more amazing - the low prices paid for now priceless paintings by Picasso and Matisse or the Steins' (particularly Sarah Stein's) amazing choices of art that was then new, provocative and avant-guard.

May 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Matisse Picasso

North Jersey

When Woody Allen gave his producer (and younger sister) Letty Aronson the script for "Midnight in Paris," she was skeptical that today's movie audience would connect with a film centered on the Parisian demimonde of the 1920s.

Feb 25 2012 | Read Full Review of Matisse Picasso

LA Times

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"The Steins Collect: Matisse, Picasso and the Parisian Avant Garde," San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 151 Third St., San Francisco, (415) 357-4000, through Sept.

May 29 2011 | Read Full Review of Matisse Picasso

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