Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami
Stories

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The mix of humour and melancholy in Murakami’s writing is extraordinary. One never wrong-foots the other and the stories have been outstandingly translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen with fluent, colloquial grace.
-Guardian

Synopsis

A dazzling new collection of short stories--the first major new work of fiction from the beloved, internationally acclaimed, Haruki Murakami since his #1 best-selling Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

Across seven tales, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are vanishing cats and smoky bars, lonely hearts and mysterious women, baseball and the Beatles, woven together to tell stories that speak to us all.

Marked by the same wry humor that has defined his entire body of work, in this collection Murakami has crafted another contemporary classic.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Haruki Murakami

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Haruki Murakami was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into forty-two languages. The most recent of his many honours is the Franz Kafka Prize.From the Hardcover edition.
 
Published May 9, 2017 by Knopf. 240 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Men Without Women
All: 7 | Positive: 5 | Negative: 2

NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Barry Lee Dejasu on Jun 05 2017

Murakami is known for his clever, offbeat (yet never over the top) tales of magical realism and the surreal; and although some of those qualities can be found here, the tales of Men Without Women are more grounded and emotionally driven, making it possibly his most unusual collection to date.

Read Full Review of Men Without Women: Stories | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

Star Tribune

Above average
Reviewed by Tom Zelman on Jun 30 2017

Some of the stories are slight...The best stories, though, pry open the impassive surfaces of human behavior to reveal “the bloody weight of desire and the rusty anchor of remorse.”

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NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Jay fielden on May 09 2017

So it might also be said of this slim but beguilingly irresistible book. Like a lost lover, it holds on tight long after the affair is over.

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LA Times

Good
Reviewed by Jeffery Renard Allen on May 04 2017

For Murakami, the process of thinking is what matters, and in this collection of seven stories Murakami wants us to consider the paradoxical interrelatedness of love and loneliness, specifically, how certain men become “Men Without Women.”

Read Full Review of Men Without Women: Stories | See more reviews from LA Times

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Kate Kellaway on May 14 2017

The mix of humour and melancholy in Murakami’s writing is extraordinary. One never wrong-foots the other and the stories have been outstandingly translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen with fluent, colloquial grace.

Read Full Review of Men Without Women: Stories | See more reviews from Guardian

National Post arts

Good
Reviewed by Heller McAlpin on May 08 2017

His meandering, mesmerizing tales of profound alienation are driven by puzzling circumstances that neither his characters nor readers can crack – recalling existentialist Gabriel Marcel’s assertion...

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Toronto Star

Good
Reviewed by Robert Wiersema on Jun 02 2017

It’s thought-provoking and powerful, a reminder that, at his best, few contemporary writers rival Murakami.

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Reader Rating for Men Without Women
79%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 62 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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