Metamorphoses by Ovid
(Penguin Classics)

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Like the meaning of the term “metamorphosis,” the text continually changes its shape in relation to the narrative...Obviously this book gets my recommendation, but let me tell you a little more about what I consider the best parts.
-Geek Speak

Synopsis

Perhaps one of the most influential works ever written, "The Metamorphoses" is an epic and narrative poem by the Roman writer Ovid. Finished in 8 AD, this work, organized into fifteen books, combines a stunning arrangement of mythological tales that are masterfully connected by a theme of transformation, most often through love. Beginning with the world's creation, the poet utilizes unparalleled wit to describe the history of the world, incorporating the most commonly known Greek and Roman myths and legends of his time in a style both dramatic and mischievous. Ovid's often sensuous poems weave together the tales of Daedalus and Icarus, Pygmalion, Persueus and Andromeda, the Trojan War, and the deification of Augustus, frequently changing the human men and women into remarkable beings through magic that rivals the gods. The best known classical work to writers during the medieval period and influencing other great artists such as Shakespeare and Titian, "The Metamorphoses" is a work that will continue to endure and inspire throughout the ages.
 

About Ovid

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Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.
 
Published January 29, 2004 by Penguin. 768 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Education & Reference, History. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Metamorphoses
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Good
on Feb 14 2004

The first thing to say about the work is that, considering its age (2,000 years, almost on the nail), it is still remarkably vivid. There is hardly a dull moment in it. It is easier to read this for pure pleasure...

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Geek Speak

Above average
on Apr 23 2013

Like the meaning of the term “metamorphosis,” the text continually changes its shape in relation to the narrative...Obviously this book gets my recommendation, but let me tell you a little more about what I consider the best parts.

Read Full Review of Metamorphoses (Penguin Classics)

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