Microcosm by Carl Zimmer
E. coli and the New Science of Life

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 7 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

A Best Book of the YearSeed Magazine Granta Magazine The Plain-DealerIn this fascinating and utterly engaging book, Carl Zimmer traces E. coli's pivotal role in the history of biology, from the discovery of DNA to the latest advances in biotechnology. He reveals the many surprising and alarming parallels between E. coli's life and our own. And he describes how E. coli changes in real time, revealing billions of years of history encoded within its genome. E. coli is also the most engineered species on Earth, and as scientists retool this microbe to produce life-saving drugs and clean fuel, they are discovering just how far the definition of life can be stretched.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Carl Zimmer

See more books from this Author
Carl Zimmer is a lecturer at Yale University, where he teaches writing about science and the environment. He is the author of numerous books, including Microcosm; Parasite Rex; Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea; At the Water’s Edge; and Soul Made Flesh. His numerous essays and articles on the life sciences have appeared in the pages of the New York Times, Scientific American, Discover, Time, Science, Popular Science, and National Geographic. His work has been anthologized in both The Best American Science Writing and The Best American Science and Nature Writing series.
 
Published May 6, 2008 by Vintage. 256 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Nature & Wildlife, Professional & Technical, Science & Math, History. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Microcosm

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

In somewhat confusing order, the author piles on descriptions and digressions into feedback circuitry, bacterial sensors, bacterial and human evolution, specialization of bacteria within colonies and cooperation across species in aggregates of bacteria in “biofilms.” He explains how E.

| Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

coli (most are innocuous) suggests something further: the divergent behavior of genetically identical bacteria, Zimmer writes, is “a warning to those who would put human nature down to any sort of simple genetic determinism.” Along with some more familiar material, Zimmer vividly describes the un...

Jun 29 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

Daily Kos

Not until I sat down to write this review did it really hit me just how packed this book is with science, each chapter written so well it can stand alone as a specific object lesson, and each lesson coming together in the book with biology, historical characters, and eureka moments in a scrumptio...

May 18 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

Science News

When science writer Carl Zimmer looks into a petri dish teeming with E.

May 12 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

New Scientist

New Scientist full online access is exclusive to subscribers.

May 07 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

Columbia Journalism Review

But in 1946, when he picked up his petri dishes and noticed the spots that appeared to be the sexual colonies he had dreamed of, Lederberg allowed himself just a single word alongside the results in his notebook: “Hooray.” As Zimmer writes, the discovery that bacteria can trade genes, and that ...

Jul 31 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

Ars Technica

coli and the New Science of Life, Science writer Carl Zimmer took that reductionist approach and applied it to a pretty big issue: life itself.

Jun 11 2008 | Read Full Review of Microcosm: E. coli and the Ne...

Reader Rating for Microcosm
95%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 38 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×