Middle Age by David Bainbridge
A Natural History

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It is when he moves on to human beings and their infinitely more muddled behaviour that the book starts to sag, as if it would like to have a nice sit down.
-Guardian

Synopsis

David Bainbridge is a vet with a particular interest in evolutionary zoology - and he has just turned forty. As well as the usual concerns about greying hair, failing eyesight and goldfish levels of forgetfulness, he finds himself pondering some bigger questions: have I come to the end of my productive life as a human being? And what I am now for? By looking afresh at the latest research from the fields of anthropology, neuroscience, psychology, and reproductive biology, it seems that the answers are surprisingly, reassuringly encouraging. In clear, engaging and amiable prose, Bainbridge explains the science behind the physical, mental and emotional changes men and women experience between the ages of 40 and 60, and reveals the evolutionary - and personal - benefits of middle age, which is unique to human beings and helps to explain the extraordinary success of our species.

Middle Age will change the way you think about mid-life, and help turn the 'crisis' into a cause for celebration.
 

About David Bainbridge

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DAVID BAINBRIDGE was trained in veterinary surgery and zoology at Cambridge University, where he now teaches Clinical Veterinary Anatomy. He is the author of four previous books: on pregnancy, on the biology of sex and sexuality, on the brain, and most recently Teenagers (Portobello, 2009).www.davidbainbridge.org
 
Published March 1, 2012 by Portobello Books. 340 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Professional & Technical, Science & Math, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
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Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Kathryn Hughes on Mar 01 2012

It is when he moves on to human beings and their infinitely more muddled behaviour that the book starts to sag, as if it would like to have a nice sit down.

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