Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

80%

12 Critic Reviews

So overall, I am giving this 4.5 out of five stars. It is a book I would recommend to anyone wanting to read a masterpiece, but I won’t suggest this to people who are not yet familiar with Salman Rushdie’s writing style.
-Blog Critics

Synopsis

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time

Winner of the Booker of Bookers

Saleem Sinai is born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, the very moment of India’s independence. Greeted by fireworks displays, cheering crowds, and Prime Minister Nehru himself, Saleem grows up to learn the ominous consequences of this coincidence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of national affairs; his health and well-being are inextricably bound to those of his nation; his life is inseparable, at times indistinguishable, from the history of his country. Perhaps most remarkable are the telepathic powers linking him with India’s 1,000 other “midnight’s children,” all born in that initial hour and endowed with magical gifts. 

This novel is at once a fascinating family saga and an astonishing evocation of a vast land and its people–a brilliant incarnation of the universal human comedy. Twenty-five years after its publication, Midnight’s Children stands apart as both an epochal work of fiction and a brilliant performance by one of the great literary voices of our time.
 

About Salman Rushdie

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Salman Rushdie is the author of nine previous novels: Grimus; Midnight's Children (which was awarded the Booker Prize in 1981 and, in 1993, was judged to be the "Booker of Bookers," the best novel to have won that prize in its first twenty-five years); Shame (winner of the French Prix de Meilleur Livre Etranger); The Satanic Verses (winner of the Whitbread Prize for Best Novel); Haroun and the Sea of Stories (winner of the Writers Guild Award); The Moor's Last Sigh (winner of the Whitbread Prize for Best Novel); The Ground Beneath Her Feet (winner of the Eurasian section of the Commonwealth Prize); Fury (a New York Times Notable Book); and Shalimar the Clown (a Time Book of the Year). He is also the author of a book of stories, East, West, and three works of nonfiction- Imaginary Homelands, The Jaguar Smile, and The Wizard of Oz. He is co-editor of Mirrorwork, an anthology of contemporary Indian writing.From the Hardcover edition.
 
Published July 23, 2010 by Random House. 674 pages
Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment, History. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Midnight's Children
All: 12 | Positive: 12 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Sam Jordison on Jul 10 2008

I was overwhelmed by its zest and sparkle; the sheer joy in creation shown in every gleefully overloaded sentence, every authorial sleight of hand and every scatological joke. Midnight's Children is (whatever Tory-oaf Boris Johnson and hordes of Booker-sceptics might say) tremendous fun.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Sam Jordison on Jul 10 2008

Enough reason to rejoice that Midnight's Children continues its glorious progress and adds the Best of Booker award to its already over-loaded prize shelf. Personally, I was torn between it and The Siege Of Krishnapur, but I at least am now convinced that Rushdie is a worthy winner.

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Blog Critics

Good
Reviewed by Jeruen Dery on Aug 20 2011

So overall, I am giving this 4.5 out of five stars. It is a book I would recommend to anyone wanting to read a masterpiece, but I won’t suggest this to people who are not yet familiar with Salman Rushdie’s writing style.

Read Full Review of Midnight's Children | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Blog Critics

Good
Reviewed by Jeruen Dery on Aug 20 2011

I mean, one cannot help but give credit to authors who have the ability to come up with a bizarre yet fascinating premise, and turn it into 530 pages of pure art...It is a book I would recommend to anyone wanting to read a masterpiece, but I won’t suggest this to people who are not yet familiar with Salman Rushdie’s writing style.

Read Full Review of Midnight's Children | See more reviews from Blog Critics

London Review of Books

Above average
Reviewed by Robert Taubman on May 07 1981

Fantasy is one of the big and most successful departments of the novel, but its true flavour in Salman Rushdie seems to me less a matter of invention than of observation. He observes reality being naturally extravagant with a humorous appreciation that is very like Dickens’s – as in a visit to a Delhi tenement...

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http://skrishnasbooks.com

Good
Reviewed by Swapna Krishna on Sep 12 2010

Midnight’s Children is really a masterpiece of twentieth century fiction. I was continually amazed by its breadth and depth, at how much Rushdie jam-packed into its pages. As a result, it is a book to be read slowly and savored...I really enjoyed it and am glad I finally got around to reading this modern classic.

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http://www.bookdrum.com

Above average
Reviewed by claireslobodian on Jul 26 2015

While Rushdie’s glittering and impressive prose is one of the novel’s biggest attractions, for many it may prove one of its biggest drawbacks...those that persevere Midnight’s Children is a stylish and engrossing record of a vivacious and political charged country as well as a provoking discussion of our relationship with history and storytelling.

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Book Review Circle

Good
Reviewed by Tanvi Singhal on Jul 26 2015

When I began reading the book, the sequence and the significance of the described events failed to make much sense to me. But as I flipped through some more pages, the story started gaining shape and gripped me...I love the mystical bonding of Saleem’s life with the significant events taking place in the country...

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Inverarity is not a Scottish village

Above average
Reviewed by Inverarity on Jul 01 2011

Of interest to a wide cross-section of readers -- those who are interested in Indian fiction, those who like historical epics, those who like family melodramas...This is not a fast-paced read and action is infrequent, and there are many, many minor characters to keep track of. I found all the little stories-within-the-story entertaining...

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Lit Lovers

Good
Reviewed by Molly Lundquist on Nov 01 2008

Midnight's Children is a riotous conglomeration of realism and magical realism, hilarity and fury, hope and disillusionment. It's like nothing you've ever read...this read is for the hardy...it's long, involved, and at times densely textured. But it 's a roller coaster of a ride, or maybe a tilt-a-whirl instead. It's one you won't forget.

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Speculiction

Good
Reviewed by Jesse on Apr 14 2014

In the end, Midnight’s Children is a superb novel of multiple dimensions and myriad smells and flavors of the Indian sub-continent. Rushdie utilizing many of the tricks and tools of post-modern writing...A dense work that must be tended and cogitated upon, the delicious imagery and spurts of the fantastic motivate the plot.

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Selections from My Tower of Shame

Good
Reviewed by Jacqueline Lademann on Sep 10 2014

But then, for whatever reason, I don't actually remember...I cracked it open. What a wonderful surprise it was. Not only was it a relatively easy book to understand, but it was a pleasure to read as well... It is a superb book and deserves all the accolades that are heaped on it, and then some. I am so glad I plucked up the courage to read it.

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Reader Rating for Midnight's Children
75%

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