Millay by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Poems (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 8 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

One of America’s most beloved poets, Edna St. Vincent Millay burst onto the literary scene at a very young age and won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923. Her passionate lyrics and superbly crafted sonnets have thrilled generations of readers long after the notoriously bohemian lifestyle she led in Greenwich Village in the 1920s ceased to shock them. Millay’s refreshing frankness and cynicism and her ardent appetite for life still burn brightly on the page more than half a century after her death.

This volume includes the early poems that many consider her best— “Renascence” and “The Ballad of the Harp Weaver” among them—as well as such often-memorized favorites as “What lips my lips have kissed” and “First Fig” (“My candle burns at both ends . . .”). The poet’s most famous verse drama, the one-act antiwar fable Aria da Capo, is included here as well.
 

About Edna St. Vincent Millay

See more books from this Author
 
Published March 2, 2010 by Everyman's Library. 224 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Millay

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Her school days- her small triumphs her chance for college, and how nearly rebellion cost her the finale;

| Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

This haunting tragic fantasy--about a poor boy whose mother dies while weaving him of ``the clothes of a king's son,/Just my size,'' on a harp that ``Nobody would take,/For song or pity's sake''--was the title poem in Millay's Pulitzer-winning collection (1923).

| Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Allowing for an almost fanatical zeal and enthusiasm for Miss Millay's work and her place in American letters, this volume is an important contribution to the study of current poetry and its interpretative value in relation to the mood of the time.

| Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Elinor Wylie, whose fewer lyrics rank with Miss Millay's own, was, on her death in 1928, accorded by the latter poet an elegiac tribute, here included, which, although but eight lines in length, is entitled to stand among the best elegies in the language: For you there is no song- Only the s...

May 21 1939 | Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Miss Millay gives us her first sheaf of new pieces in three years.

Nov 04 1934 | Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

New biographies by Nancy Milford and Daniel Mark Epstein show the price Edna St. Vincent Millay had to pay to achieve the haunting power of her best poems.

Sep 16 2001 | Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

But in the morning light he finds her, ``A smile about her lips, / And a light about her head, / And her hands in the harp strings / Frozen dead.'' The poem is an odd choice as the basis of a children's book, ending as it does with every child's worst fear.

| Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

DenverPost.com

Yasmina Reza’s Tony-award-winning play, “Art,” places its characters in situations where they are forced to confront aspects of the relationship they’ve chosen to suppress.

Aug 21 2012 | Read Full Review of Millay: Poems (Everyman's Lib...

Reader Rating for Millay
90%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 5 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×