Mirror Mirror by Marilyn Singer
A Book of Reversible Verse

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Synopsis

With 6 starred reviews, 8 best of the year lists, and over 20 state award nominations, everyone is raving about Mirror Mirror!

"Remarkable."—The Washington Post

"This mind-bending poetry is accompanied by Masse's equally intelligent, equally amusing art."—Time Out New York for Kids

What’s brewing when two favorites—poetry and fairy tales—are turned (literally) on their heads? It’s a revolutionary recipe: an infectious new genre of poetry and a lovably modern take on classic stories.

First, read the poems forward (how old-fashioned!), then reverse the lines and read again to give familiar tales, from Sleeping Beauty to that Charming Prince, a delicious new spin. Witty, irreverent, and warm, this gorgeously illustrated and utterly unique offering holds a mirror up to language and fairy tales, and renews the fun and magic of both.

 

About Marilyn Singer

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Marilyn Singer is the author of over ninety books for children. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Washington, Connecticut. For more information, please visit: www.marilynsinger.net Alexandra Boiger has illustrated several picture and chapter books, among them While Mama had a Quick Little Chat, Tallulah's Tutu, and the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books. Originally from Munich, Germany, she now lives in California. Please visit her at www.alexandraboiger.com.
 
Published March 4, 2010 by Dutton Books for Young Readers. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Mirror Mirror

Kirkus Reviews

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A collection of masterful fairy-tale–inspired reversos—a poetic form invented by the author, in which each poem is presented forward and backward.

Dec 22 2010 | Read Full Review of Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reve...

Publishers Weekly

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In “In the Hood,” Little Red Riding Hood’s poem ends: “But a girl/ mustn’t dawdle./ After all, Grandma’s waiting,” while the wolf’s poem begins: “After all, Grandma’s waiting,/ mustn’t dawdle.../ But a girl!” Masse’s clever compositions play with symmetry (in “Longing for Beauty,” Beauty and the ...

Feb 08 2010 | Read Full Review of Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reve...

The Washington Post

Try writing a poem that, when read backward, still makes sense but means the exact opposite.

Apr 07 2010 | Read Full Review of Mirror Mirror: A Book of Reve...

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