Mixedblood Messages by Louis Owens
Literature, Film, Family, Place (American Indian Literature & Critical Studies)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 5 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

In this challenging and often humorous book, Louis Owens examines issues of Indian identity and relationship to the environment as depicted in literature and film and as embodied in his own mixedblood roots in family and land. Powerful social and historical forces, he maintains, conspire to colonize literature and film by and about Native Americans into a safe "Indian Territory" that will contain and neutralize Indians. Countering this colonial "Territory" is what Owens defines as "Frontier," a dynamic, uncontainable, multi-directional space within which cultures meet and even merge.

Owens offers new insights into the works of Indian writers ranging from John Rollin Ridge, Mourning Dove, and D'Arcy McNickle to N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silko, James Welch, and Gerald Vizenor. In his analysis of Indians in film he scrutinizes distortions of Indians as victims or vanishing Americans in a series of John Wayne movies and in the politically correct but false gestures of the more recent Dances With Wolves. As Owens moves through his personal landscape in Oklahoma, Mississippi, California, and New Mexico, he questions how human beings collectively can alter their disastrous relationship with the natural world before they destroy it. He challenges all of us to articulate, through literature and other means, messages of personal and environmental — as well as cultural—survival, and to explore and share these messages by writing and reading across cultural boundaries. 

 

About Louis Owens

See more books from this Author
-->Louis Owens-->, who is of Choctaw-Cherokee-Irish descent, is Professor of English at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of several books, including Other Destinies: Understanding the AmericanIndian Novel and the novels The Sharpest Sight and BoneGame, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press.
 
Published September 1, 1998 by University of Oklahoma Press. 288 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Humor & Entertainment, Arts & Photography, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Mixedblood Messages

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Essays of mixed quality on mixed issues by a writer of mixed ethnicity.

| Read Full Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literatu...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

An issue that is often debated is who gets to tell the stories for Native Americans? Only full-blooded, reservation-raised Indians, or anyone with Indian ancestry? In this collection of essays, Owens

Aug 31 1998 | Read Full Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literatu...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Owens's position here, while tediously quoting Vizenor, is that ""Euramericans"" have conspired to create a myth of Indigenous Americans as braided, buckskin-wearing, noble savages and that bestselling Native American writers are perpetuating the stereotype by buying into white expectations of ""...

| Read Full Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literatu...

Project MUSE

He unflinchingly explores such issues as the value and applicability of mainstream literary theory to analyzing Native American texts, the offensive use of romanticized stereotypes of American Indians in order to market literary texts to mainstream audiences, and the ways in which static assumpti...

| Read Full Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literatu...

Project MUSE

The first section of the book, titled "Mixedbloods and Mixed Messages: Adventures in Native American Literature," includes chapters exploring such issues as the value of literary theory when analyzing native texts, the offensive use of romanticized stereotypes of Indians to market literary texts...

| Read Full Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literatu...

Rate this book!

Add Review
×