Moby Dick by Herman Melville
The Graphic Novel (Campfire Graphic Novels)

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Synopsis

It was an obsession that would destroy them all...

On a cold December night, a young man called Ishmael rents a room at an inn in Massachusetts. He has come from Manhattan to the north-east of America to sign up for a whaling expedition.

Later that same night, as Ishmael is sleeping, a heavily tattooed man wielding a blade enters his room. This chance meeting is just the start of what will become the greatest adventure of his life.

The next day, Ishmael joins the crew of a ship known as the Pequod. He is approached by a man dressed in rags who warns him that, if he sails under the command of Captain Ahab, he may never come back. Undaunted, Ishmael returns early the next morning and leaves for the high seas.

For the crew of the Pequod, their voyage is one of monetary gain. For Captain Ahab, however, it is a mission driven by hatred, revenge, and his growing obsession with the greatest creature of the sea.
 

About Herman Melville

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Herman Melville (1819-1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet who received wide acclaim for his earliest novels, such as Typee and Redburn, but fell into relative obscurity by the end of his life. Today, Melville is hailed as one of the definitive masters of world literature for novels including Moby Dick and Billy Budd, as well as for enduringly popular short stories such as Bartleby, the Scrivener and The Bell-Tower.
 
Published June 1, 2010 by Campfire. 88 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Moby Dick

Kirkus Reviews

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In this slender graphic adaptation of Melville's magnum opus, Ishmael, Queequeg and the rest of the uniformly burly, steely-eyed whalers are strong presences in Singh's art—at least until their pale, gargantuan nemesis shows up to scatter them and their ship as flotsam across the waves.

Jun 29 2010 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Kirkus Reviews

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A pity he chooses to end the retelling with the simplistic and wholly un-Melville-ian lesson, “The moral of this story is, / as my sad tale has shown: / Respect all creatures, great and small, / and leave the whales alone!” The high point of the title turns out to be Glass’ art.

Jul 25 2012 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Kirkus Reviews

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But Philbrick isn’t simply hunting for proof of the novel’s ongoing “relevance.” He praises Melville’s acute understanding of “the microclimates of intimate human relations,” takes a close look at some of the novel’s more powerfully poetic passages and honors the Melville himself, who was plagued...

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The New York Times

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Concerning the 2007 lead-paint scare about Chinese-made Thomas & Friends railway toys, he says, “It wasn’t merely the lead in the paint that scared us but the magnitude of our ignorance.” The last and most definitive parts of this book take Mr. Hohn to the apparent heart of darkness of h...

Feb 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

The New York Times

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Melville sailed on whaling expeditions and understood well the crushing labor required to sustain America’s prosperity — to keep the whale oil burning in a rich man’s lamp — as well as the delicate maneuvering required to pilot a crew whose “demographic diversity,” as Philbrick calls it, predicte...

Oct 21 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Publishers Weekly

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Severin is mystified that the whales don't flee as the hunters draw near enough to attack: ""Where is their sense of self-preservation?"" But the hunters know: the whale gives himself to those who have performed the ritual;

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Publishers Weekly

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Although some children may have trouble with some of the more adult themes (the fact that this is a revenge mission for Ahab, Queequeg builds himself a coffin and only Ishmael survives), whale and sea lovers will learn a great deal (especially in the concluding author's note).

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Publishers Weekly

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Despite forgoing Melville's "Call me Ishmael" first-person narrative and sensory details, this retelling closely adheres to the original plot, including some pivotal scenes absent from Allan Drummond's spare but entertaining 1997 Moby Dick.

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BC Books

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Some few of the clueless millions who've never read Moby-Dick may be inspired by Philbrick to dive into Melville's wild, deep, metaphysically didactic ocean and — like the rest of us — revel in adventure on the high seas while they — like Ahab — seek all there is to know about the lethal leviathan.

Apr 23 2012 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Book Reporter

WHY READ MOBY-DICK?

Oct 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

The Washington Post

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Nov 30 2010 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Journal Sentinel

Philbrick explains much and provides context for understanding both the novel and Melville's life, but this is not the kind of guide a student uses to take apart a novel.

Oct 21 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Portland Book Review

Each drawing is presented with a quote from the page that inspired the drawing, as well as a brief description of the drawing, similar to the information on a museum card.

Dec 28 2012 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

London Review of Books

What it means to say – what the passage as a whole means to say – is that however distant from the proper enterprise of whaling he is, however fierce his contempt for production and profit, Ahab is in the end its most refined emanation: he is the essence, rather than the semblance, of the whaling...

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ForeWord Reviews

“In an environment absolutely saturated with digitally created content, where original art often never really exists as a physical object and is instead simply a JPG on a computer somewhere,” he explains, “it was deeply important to me to reconnect these Moby-Dick illustrations with the older and...

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LA Times

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The Pequod negotiates Mercury Theatre on the Air waters in Orson Welles' "Moby Dick -- Rehearsed" at the Lyric Theatre.

Aug 11 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Media Mikes

Charlie Cox was believable in the role of Ishmael but gotta give some props to Raoul Trujillo in the role of Queequeg.

Oct 17 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

The [TK] Review

Moby-Dick proved a very tiresome yarn indeed, and as for [Pierre, or] the Ambiguities, we are compelled to say that it seems to us the most aptly titled volume we have met with for years.”) He’s the Melville with an unhappy marriage, the Melville rejected and dejected by Hawthorne, the Melville w...

Dec 13 2011 | Read Full Review of Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel ...

Reader Rating for Moby Dick
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