Money Boy by Paul Yee

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Yee’s biggest mistake with Money Boy was the lack of development in the plot and main character. Instead of sympathizing with Ray, the self-conflicted protagonist, we are sick of his whining by the second chapter and are faced with one-dimensional characters for the rest of the book.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

Ray Liu knows he should be happy. He lives in a big suburban house with all the latest electronic gadgets, and even finds plenty of time to indulge in his love of gaming. He needs the escape. It’s tough getting grades that will please his army veteran father, when speaking English is still a struggle. And he can’t quite connect with his gang at high school — immigrants like himself but who seem to have adjusted to North American life more easily. Then comes his father accesses Ray’s internet account, and discovers Ray has been cruising gay websites. Before Ray knows what has hit him, his belongings have been thrown on the front lawn, and he has been kicked out. Angry, defiant, Ray heads to downtown Toronto. In short order he is robbed, beaten up and seduced, and he learns the hard realities of life on the street. Could he really sell himself for sex? Lots of people use their bodies to make money — athletes, actors, models, pop singers. If no one gets hurt, why should anyone care?
 

About Paul Yee

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PAUL YEE is a writer and archivist who grew up around Vancouver\s Chinatown and is now living in Toronto. He has written many stories and articles and has won the Ruth Schwartz Children\'s Book Award the IODE Book Award and the Sheila A. Egoff Children\'s Prize.'
 
Published August 23, 2011 by Groundwood Books. 192 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Money Boy
All: 1 | Positive: 0 | Negative: 1

National Post arts

Below average
Reviewed by Catherine Gao on Dec 16 2011

Yee’s biggest mistake with Money Boy was the lack of development in the plot and main character. Instead of sympathizing with Ray, the self-conflicted protagonist, we are sick of his whining by the second chapter and are faced with one-dimensional characters for the rest of the book.

Read Full Review of Money Boy | See more reviews from National Post arts

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79%

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