Monsoon by Robert D. Kaplan
The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 9 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

On the world maps common in America, the Western Hemisphere lies front and center, while the Indian Ocean region all but disappears. This convention reveals the geopolitical focus of the now-departed twentieth century, but in the twenty-first century that focus will fundamentally change. In this pivotal examination of the countries known as “Monsoon Asia”—which include India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Burma, Oman, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Tanzania—bestselling author Robert D. Kaplan shows how crucial this dynamic area has become to American power. It is here that the fight for democracy, energy independence, and religious freedom will be lost or won, and it is here that American foreign policy must concentrate if the United States is to remain relevant in an ever-changing world. From the Horn of Africa to the Indonesian archipelago and beyond, Kaplan exposes the effects of population growth, climate change, and extremist politics on this unstable region, demonstrating why Americans can no longer afford to ignore this important area of the world.

 

About Robert D. Kaplan

See more books from this Author
Robert D. Kaplan is chief geopolitical analyst for Stratfor, a private global intelligence firm, and the author of fourteen books on foreign affairs and travel translated into many languages, including "The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate; Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and the Future of American Power; Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History; "and" Warrior Politics: Why Leadership Demands a Pagan Ethos." He has been a foreign correspondent for "The Atlantic" for more than a quarter-century. In 2011 and 2012, "Foreign Policy" magazine named Kaplan among the world's "Top 100 Global Thinkers." From 2009 to 2011, he served under Secretary of Defense Robert Gates as a member of the Defense Policy Board. Since 2008, he has been a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security in Washington. From 2006 to 2008, he was the Class of 1960 Distinguished Visiting Professor in National Security at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis.
 
Published October 19, 2010 by Random House. 384 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Business & Economics, History, Education & Reference, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Monsoon

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Today, with the Indian Ocean comprising nearly one half of the world’s container traffic—and 70 percent of the traffic in the world’s petroleum products—this is a strategic swath indeed, where “China expands vertically, India horizontally,” and America, happily ensconced between the Atlantic and ...

| Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Perhaps, as the two Asian giants grow stronger, and with America “in elegant decline,” the era of United States naval dominance in the Greater Indian Ocean will give way to “an American-Indian-Chinese condominium of sorts.” Pursuing their shared interests in peaceful trade and development, the th...

Nov 19 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Perhaps, as the two Asian giants grow stronger, and with America “in elegant decline,” the era of United States naval dominance in the Greater Indian Ocean will give way to “an American-Indian-Chinese condominium of sorts.” Pursuing their shared interests in peaceful trade and development, the th...

Nov 19 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Kaplan (Balkan Ghosts), correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly, inculcates a paradigm shift when he suggests that the site of 21st-century geopolitical significance will be the Indian Ocean, not the northern Atlantic.

Jul 05 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

The Wall Street Journal

See more reviews from this publication

It should be noted that the navies of China and India will soon rank second and third in the world, trailing only the U.S. India fears encirclement by China, and India's other neighbors are increasingly uneasy about Beijing's swelling power and assertiveness.

| Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

The Wall Street Journal

See more reviews from this publication

We have come to accept that the 500-year domination of Asia by the West is coming to an end and that the balance of power in the 21st century will rest on the fortunes of China, India and the United States.

Oct 16 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

AV Club

See more reviews from this publication

(Actually, as Kaplan points out, it’s the autonomous sub-state of Puntland rather than the whole country.) Kaplan blends scrupulously fair-minded historical recaps with profiles of local movers and shakers.

Dec 02 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

Dallas News

As Kaplan points out, "China is not like the United States, whose leaders, both Democrat and Republican, seek the moral improvement of the world as a basis of foreign policy."

Oct 31 2010 | Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

London Review of Books

After the violence ended, towns divided themselves into Muslim and Christian enclaves, with each place having two of every local amenity: a bank for Christians and one for Muslims, a hotel for Christians and one for Muslims, a market for Christians and one for Muslims.

| Read Full Review of Monsoon: The Indian Ocean and...

Reader Rating for Monsoon
85%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 125 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×