Moral Disorder by Margaret Atwood
and Other Stories

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Synopsis

Margaret Atwood’s latest brilliant collection of short stories follows the life of a single character, seen as a girl growing up the 1930s, a young woman in the 50s and 60s, and, in the present day, half of a couple, no longer young, reflecting on the new state of the world. Each story focuses on the ways relationships transform a character’s life: a woman’s complex love for a married man, the grief upon the death of parents and the joy with the birth of children, the realization of what growing old with someone you love really means. By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, Moral Disorder displays Atwood’s celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Margaret Atwood

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Born November 18, 1939, in Ottawa, Canada, Margaret Atwood spent her early years in the northern Quebec wilderness. Settling in Toronto in 1946, she continued to spend summers in the northern woods. This experience provided much of the thematic material for her verse. She began her writing career as a poet, short story writer, cartoonist, and reviewer for her high school paper. She received a B.A. from Victoria College, University of Toronto in 1961 and an M.A. from Radcliff College in 1962. Atwood's first book of verse, Double Persephone, was published in 1961 and was awarded the E. J. Pratt Medal. She has published numerous books of poetry, novels, story collections, critical work, juvenile work, and radio and teleplays. Her works include The Journals of Susanna Moodie (1970), Power Politics (1971), Cat's Eye (1986), The Robber Bride (1993), Morning in the Buried House (1995), and Alias Grace (1996). Many of her works focus on women's issues. She has won numerous awards for her poetry and fiction including the Prince of Asturias award for Literature, the Booker Prize, the Governor General's Award in 1966 for The Circle Game and in 1986 for The Handmaid's Tale, which also won the very first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987.
 
Published February 12, 2008 by Anchor. 240 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Moral Disorder

Kirkus Reviews

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The agonies of being a sensitive teen and a socially challenged “brain” are beautifully captured in “My Last Duchess.” Then, Nell (finally named, when Atwood shifts into omniscient narration) finds something less than happiness when the aforementioned Tig leaves his flamboyant, demanding wife Oon...

Jul 15 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

The New York Times

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In Margaret Atwood’s linked stories, the threat of disaster is always close at hand.

Oct 15 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

The Guardian

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Moral Disorder by Margaret Atwood Bloomsbury £15.99, pp257 More than 20 years ago, Margaret Atwood wrote a short story called 'Happy Endings' that presented a series of possible plots that could follow the beginning 'John and Mary meet'.

Sep 17 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

The Guardian

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Moral Disorder by Margaret Atwood 260pp, Bloomsbury, £15.99 Most collections of short stories by a single author are grab-bags, but some approach or achieve real unity;

Sep 23 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

Publishers Weekly

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Her life-like Atwood's book-is ""a sock drawer into which a number of disparate things were shoved, a jumble."" Apparently personal, perhaps even autobiographical, these stories are knit together by the ""moral disorder"" Atwood sees in everyone from one generation to the next.

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Book Reporter

A good friend of mine is also an incurable Margaret Atwood "fan" and has reminded me yet again of our shared benign affliction, craving assurance that she still has first dibs on MORAL DISORDER the moment I've soaked up the last word of the last paragraph of the last story.

Jan 07 2011 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

AV Club

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As it becomes clear that all the episodes have been about a girl named Nell progressing through various stages of life, the book takes on a more novelistic cohesion, and develops a less ethereal tone.

Oct 12 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

Bookmarks Magazine

Atwood is cunning with time, jumping ahead or behind story to story, and often within a story."

Aug 22 2007 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

IBN Live

This becomes achingly apparent in the last two stories where Atwood delivers a heart-wrenching first-person narrative about – what is purposefully in this story – an unnamed mature protagonist serving as loving caretaker of rapidly declining elderly parents.

Nov 29 2010 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

blogTO

Here's the story on me and Margaret Atwood.

Sep 20 2006 | Read Full Review of Moral Disorder: and Other Sto...

Reader Rating for Moral Disorder
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