More on War by Martin van Creveld

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...the larger international community as well to further their strategic interests. It would have been thought-provoking to hear the author’s opinion on this topic and this is the only real inadequacy in this overall very fine book.
-NY Journal of Books

Synopsis

"War is the most important thing in the world," writes Martin van Creveld, military historian and author of the monumental work, The Rise and Decline of the State. The survival of every country, government, and individual is ultimately dependent on war - or the ability to wage it in self-defense. That is why, though it may come but once in a hundred years, every country must be prepared every day.

In spite of the centrality of war to human history and culture, there has long been no modern attempt to provide a replacement for the classics on war and strategy: Sun Tzu's The Art of War, dating from the 5th or 6th century BC, and Carl von Clausewitz's On War, written in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

What is needed is a modern, comprehensive, easy to read and understand theory of war for the 21st century that could serve as a replacement for these classic texts. The purpose of the present book is to provide such a theory.
 

About Martin van Creveld

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Martin van Creveld was born in the Netherlands in 1946 and has lived in Israel from 1950. Having studied in Jerusalem and London, since 1971 he has been on the faculty of the History Department, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. A specialist in military history and strategy, he is the author of 17 books, and has appeared regularly on CBS, CNN and the BBC.
 
Published March 1, 2017 by OUP Oxford. 256 pages
Genres: History, War, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
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NY Journal of Books

Above average
Reviewed by Jerry Lenaburg on Mar 31 2017

...the larger international community as well to further their strategic interests. It would have been thought-provoking to hear the author’s opinion on this topic and this is the only real inadequacy in this overall very fine book.

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