Mouse and the Cossacks by Paul Wilson

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That her silence is both the result of trauma and one of a roster of manipulative behaviours is explored with increasing pathos as the novel evolves.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Mouse de Bruin is under siege. Without a voice since the age of six, she is trying to work things out about the world. She and her mother have moved into a rented Pennine farmhouse in which reminders of the man who lived there previously, William Crosby, lie all around her. Fighting to hold the outside world at bay, Mouse becomes increasingly drawn to William, a man who seems to have been haunted by secrets. As Mouse's investigations lead her towards some of the people who knew him, she unearths a collection of letters about William's experience as a young officer in the chaotic final weeks of the war. But why, as Mouse begins to uncover the mysteries of William's past life, is she so keen to eliminate all traces of her own?
 

About Paul Wilson

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Paul Wilson is a winner of the Portico Prize for Literature for Do White Whales Sing at the Edge of the World? His previous novel, The Visiting Angel, was shortlisted for the 2011-12 Portico Fiction Prize. He has worked in a range of social care settings and is Vice Chairman of the British Association for Supported Employment. He lives in Lancashire.
 
Published June 6, 2013 by Tindal Street Press. 240 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Mouse and the Cossacks
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Guardian

Excellent
Reviewed by Jane Housham on Jun 28 2013

That her silence is both the result of trauma and one of a roster of manipulative behaviours is explored with increasing pathos as the novel evolves.

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