Multitudes by Lucy Caldwell

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It’s a stylistic choice that can take some getting used to. Where one might have expected a first-person narrator, it sometimes feels as though she’s telling herself a story...
-Guardian

Synopsis

'Beautifully crafted, and so finely balanced that she holds the reader right up against the tender humanity of her characters.' Eimear McBride

'A writer of rare elegance and beauty, Caldwell doesn't just get inside her characters' minds. She perches in the precarious chambers of their hearts, telling their stories truthfully and tenderly.' Independent

Multitudes is the beautiful debut story collection from the acclaimed, prize-winning novelist and playwright Lucy Caldwell

From Belfast to London and back again the ten stories that comprise Caldwell's first collection explore the many facets of growing up - the pain and the heartache, the tenderness and the joy, the fleeting and the formative - or 'the drunkenness of things being various'. Stories of longing and belonging, they culminate with the heart-wrenching and unforgettable title story.

 

About Lucy Caldwell

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Lucy Caldwell was born in Belfast in 1981. She read English at Queens' College, Cambridge, and is a graduate of Goldsmith's MA in Creative and Life Writing. Her debut novel Where They Were Missed (2006), was described in the Independent as 'beautifully paced, evocative and unfaltering . . . an object lesson in balancing the personal and the political'. An award-winning playwright, she is currently under commission to write for the main stage of the Royal Court Theatre. Her most recent novel, The meeting Point won the Dylan Thomas Prize 2011.
 
Published May 3, 2016 by Faber & Faber. 240 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Jane Housham on Jun 03 2016

It’s a stylistic choice that can take some getting used to. Where one might have expected a first-person narrator, it sometimes feels as though she’s telling herself a story...

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