Munich by Robert Harris
A novel

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Most impressively, Harris rarely falls for lazily foreshadowing what is to come for the world; he concentrates on Munich in 1938, and its seismic convergence of corrupt and naive power.
-Guardian

Synopsis

From the internationally best-selling author of Fatherland and the Cicero Trilogy--a new spy thriller about treason and conscience, loyalty and betrayal, set against the backdrop of the fateful Munich Conference of September, 1938.

Guy Legat is a rising star of the British diplomatic service, serving in 10 Downing Street as a private secretary to the Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain. Rikard von Holz is on the staff of the German Foreign Office--and secretly a member of the anti-Hitler resistance. The two men were friends at Oxford in the 1920s, but have not been in contact since. Now, when Guy flies with Chamberlain from London to Munich, and Rikard travels on Hitler's train overnight from Berlin, their paths are set on a disastrous collision course. And once again, Robert Harris gives us actual events of historical importance--here are Hitler, Chamberlain, Mussolini, Daladier--at the heart of an electrifying, un-put-downable novel.
 

About Robert Harris

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Robert Harris is the author of Pompeii, Enigma, and Fatherland. He has been a television correspondent with the BBC and a newspaper columnist for the London Sunday Times and The Daily Telegraph. His novels have sold more than ten million copies and been translated into thirty languages. He lives in Berkshire, England, with his wife and four children.
 
Published January 16, 2018 by Knopf. 304 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, War, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Munich
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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Ben East on Sep 17 2017

Most impressively, Harris rarely falls for lazily foreshadowing what is to come for the world; he concentrates on Munich in 1938, and its seismic convergence of corrupt and naive power.

Read Full Review of Munich: A novel | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Anthony Quinn on Sep 15 2017

A tantalising addition to the inexhaustible game of “what if?”, Munich is one of Robert Harris’s more contained performances, less daring than Fatherland, not as compulsive as Pompeii, his best novel.

Read Full Review of Munich: A novel | See more reviews from Guardian

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