Musicophilia by Oliver Sacks
Tales of Music and the Brain

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Synopsis

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With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds-for everything but music. Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks' latest masterpiece.




From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Oliver Sacks

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Oliver Sacks is a practicing physician and the author of more than ten books, including Musicophilia, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Awakenings (which inspired the Oscar-nominated film). He lives in New York City, where he is professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center and the first Columbia University Artist.
 
Published September 23, 2008 by Vintage. 400 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Education & Reference, Arts & Photography, Professional & Technical, Self Help, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Musicophilia

Kirkus Reviews

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Less frightening are stories about people like Martin, a severely disabled man who committed some 2,000 operas to memory, or ruminations on the linkage between perfect pitch and language: Young children learning music are vastly more likely to have perfect pitch if they speak Mandarin than almost...

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The New York Times

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In Dr. Sacks’ view, music can aid aphasics and patients with parkinsonism, and it can help orient and anchor patients with advanced dementia because “musical perception, musical sensibility, musical emotion and musical memory can survive long after other forms of memory have disappeared.” Music,...

Nov 20 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

The New York Times

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Grant, who apparently claimed to know just two tunes: “One is Yankee Doodle and the other is not.” Freud, despite being both Viennese and a medical man, said he was almost incapable of obtaining any pleasure from music: “Some rationalistic, or perhaps analytic, turn of mind in me rebels against b...

Oct 28 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

The Guardian

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Musicophilia : Tales of Music and the Brain by Oliver Sacks Buy it from the Guardian bookshop Search the Guardian bookshop Apparently, Che Guevara was...

Oct 25 2008 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

The Guardian

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One woman Sacks cites "had seizures only in response to 'modern, dissonant music,' never in response to classical or romantic music" - and her husband was a composer of the type of music that gave her seizures, which one suspects may be a hint.

Nov 03 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

Publishers Weekly

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Neurologist and professor Sacks, best known for his books Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, dedicates his latest effort to the relationship between music and unusual brain disorders.

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BC Books

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His previous books of essays, including Awakenings (1973), The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1985), and Anthropologist on Mars all have included vignettes of patients profoundly affected by brain injury and profoundly restored by music.

Jan 21 2008 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

Entertainment Weekly

B+ Originally posted Oct 19, 2007 Published in issue #961 Oct 26, 2007 Order article reprints

Oct 19 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

The Bookbag

Summary: A look by Oliver Sacks, physician and neurologist, at the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians and everyday people, largely through a series of individual case histories.

Oct 24 2009 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

San Francisco Chronicle

Leading a documentary crew through his Bronx psychiatric hospital posting in 1973, as the distinguished psychiatrist-author recalls in his new study, "Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain," the film's director declared, "Can I meet the music therapist?

Nov 02 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

Monsters and Critics

But then Sacks, concluding with the superfluous, gives the reader this: “…Another is the omnipresence of annoyingly catchy tunes, the brainworms that arrive unbidden and leave only in their own time- catchy tunes that may, in fact, be nothing more than advertisements for toothpaste but are, neuro...

Jan 04 2008 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

New Scientist

Yet they would come alive to music and dance and sing, only to retreat into their frozen state once the music stopped.

Dec 08 2007 | Read Full Review of Musicophilia: Tales of Music ...

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