Nairn's London by Ian Nairn

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...while much remains, so much is now gone. Here is the value of the book: as record, as testament, as the Horatian monument in words more lasting than bronze.
-Guardian

Synopsis

TELEGRAPH BOOKS OF THE YEAR and OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2014 'This book is a record of what has moved me between Uxbridge and Dagenham. My hope is that it moves you, too.' Nairn's London is an idiosyncratic, poetic and intensely subjective meditation on a city and its buildings. Including railway stations, synagogues, abandoned gasworks, dock cranes, suburban gardens, East End markets, Hawksmoor churches, a Gothic cinema and twenty-seven different pubs, it is a portrait of the soul of a place, from a writer of genius.
 

About Ian Nairn

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Ian Nairn (1930-1983) was a hugely influential and pugnacious architectural critic, inventor of the crushing term 'subtopia' and central to the growth of the British conservation movement. He co-wrote with Nikolaus Pevsner the Sussex volume in the Buildings of England series. London was his great obsession and Nairn's London his lasting monument. He once paid his wife the compliment of stating that she 'would certainly have been in Nairn's London had she only been made of brick or stucco'.
 
Published December 30, 2014 by Penguin Classic. 272 pages
Genres: History, Arts & Photography, Travel, Education & Reference. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Nairn's London
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by David Piper on Mar 31 2016

There are 89 excellent photographs, mostly by the author; there is an excellent specialist’s index, of categories of objects, thrown in for good measure. The book is necessary for all who love London...

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Nicholas Lezard on Oct 28 2014

...while much remains, so much is now gone. Here is the value of the book: as record, as testament, as the Horatian monument in words more lasting than bronze.

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