Newspaperman by Warren Phillips
Inside the News Business at The Wall Street Journal

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Synopsis

The captivating story of former Wall Street Journal publisher Warren Phillips’s rise to the top

Newspaperman is at once a fascinating narrative of one man's journey through the newspaper business and an expert analysis of how the news is made. Phillips shows what it's like to be a reporter as history unfolds around him and reveals how editors and publishers debate and decide how the news will be covered.

Starting at the WSJ when it had a circulation of only 100,000, Phillips rose through the ranks, witnessing its rapid expansion to a circulation over two million—the country's highest. Newspaperman illustrates the life of a foreign correspondent, taking readers from Berlin to Belgrade, Athens to Ankara, London to Madrid. It also provides a look into the inner councils of the Pulitzer Prize Board as legendary editors, such as Ben Bradlee of The Washington Post and Clayton Kirkpatrick of The Chicago Tribune, debate journalistic ethics.

Warren H. Phillips began his journalism career as a copy boy at The New York Herald Tribune. He then served The Wall Street Journal as proofreader, copydesk hand, rewriteman, foreign correspondent, foreign editor, and Chicago editor before becoming managing editor at age thirty. He served in that post and as executive editor for thirteen years, and then was the WSJ's publisher and chief executive of its parent company, Dow Jones & Company, for another fifteen years.
 

About Warren Phillips

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Warren H. Phillips worked at "The Wall Street Journal" as proofreader, copydesk hand, rewriteman, foreign correspondent, foreign editor, and Chicago editor before becoming managing editor at age thirty. He was later promoted to publisher and CEO of its parent corporation, Dow Jones & Company. Phillips has also served as President of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board. He and his wife live in Bridgehampton, NY, and Palm Beach, FL.
 
Published September 12, 2011 by McGraw-Hill. 336 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Business & Economics, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Newspaperman

Kirkus Reviews

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The author was personally involved with much of the growth, after his transfer to London and then Germany to build the paper's operations in Europe, and he was integral to the development of the Wall Street Journal Asia and the paper’s partnership with Japan's Nikkei index.

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Publishers Weekly

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His romance with the news business began with a tour of the fabled New York Daily News with his father as a child, continuing with a stint as a copyboy at the New York Herald Tribune, followed as a full-time German correspondent at WSJ, with stories filed in Greece, Turkey, and London.

Jul 25 2011 | Read Full Review of Newspaperman: Inside the News...

The Wall Street Journal

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A free-market outlook would come in handy as publisher of the Journal, though Mr. Phillips was never as conservative as the paper's editorial writers, and "Newspaperman" is curiously detached from the political passions that Mr. Phillips reported on.

Sep 16 2011 | Read Full Review of Newspaperman: Inside the News...

New York Journal of Books

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however, the adventures and misadventures involved in running such a huge empire are more than enough to keep the reader fascinated by this journey of nearly half a century.”Warren Phillips started work at the Wall Street Journal as a copy desk assistant doing proofreading and rewrites.

Sep 16 2011 | Read Full Review of Newspaperman: Inside the News...

The Washington Times

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Yes, Mr. Phillips was in charge when parent company Dow Jones decided in the 1980s to buy the financial information company Telerate, probably its biggest single mistake, and he anointed Peter Kann, another star reporter, to run the company right up until Mr. Murdoch bought it.

Sep 16 2011 | Read Full Review of Newspaperman: Inside the News...

City Book Review

The yardstick, when wondering if an action is proper, is to ask yourself if you’d be comfortable seeing it splashed across the front page of the next morning’s newspaper.” A man who has dined with Presidents, foreign heads of State, and corporate moguls, Phillips confesses his regrets of comprom...

Apr 26 2012 | Read Full Review of Newspaperman: Inside the News...

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