Nine Man Tree by Robert Newton Peck

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

From the author of the best-selling classic A Day No Pigs Would Die
In Depression-era Florida, twelve-year-old Yoolee's main concern in life is protecting his little sister, Havilah, and his long-suffering mother, Ruth Ann, from the violent rages of his alcoholic father. Then another horror enters their lives when the tiny swampland settlement is stalked by an enormous--and voracious--wild boar. When Yoolee's father disappears on a drunken binge, it's up to Yoolee to protect his family once again. In this spellbinding adventure and compelling coming-of-age novel, Robert Newton Peck continues his tradition of providing fine literature for young adult readers.  
 

About Robert Newton Peck

See more books from this Author
Robert Newton Peck's first novel was the highly acclaimed A Day No Pigs Would Die. He has written more than sixty books, including the sequel, A Part of the Sky, and he is also the winner of the Mark Tvain Award for his Soup series of children's books. Many of his novels are deeply rooted in rural Vermont, where he grew up.Rob plays jazz and ragtime piano, and tends eleven mustang horses and two cats. He and his wife, Sam, reside in Florida, the setting for Nine Man Tree.From the Paperback edition.
 
Published August 25, 1998 by Random House Books for Young Readers. 192 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Travel, Action & Adventure, Children's Books. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Nine Man Tree

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Yoolee Tharp is desperate to protect his mother and beloved younger sister Havilah, but his drinking, big-talking father, Velmer, is all but useless (and “mean, ornery, sneaky, greedy,” as well as a “brainless fool,” and an “unfeeling bully”).

| Read Full Review of Nine Man Tree

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Peck fondly recalls the stoic, hard-working folks who molded his values when he was growing up poor in rural Vermont—family members (including his 110-year-old ["some claimed older"] Aunt Ida, who reputedly killed a "drunken half-crazed Saint Francis Indian....

| Read Full Review of Nine Man Tree

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

For example, when Velmer is gored by the hog, his wife sews him up with an ordinary sewing needle: ""Her hands were small, yet they appeared to handle any task in a strong way, as if there was might inside her somewhere, ready to spew out like spite from a cornered coon."" A tale full of bite.

| Read Full Review of Nine Man Tree

Rate this book!

Add Review