No Nonsense by Joey Barton
The Autobiography

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Barton is a serial adopter of the fresh start; over the years, he has repeatedly declared himself a new man, wiser, more mature, in control of the destructive impulses that assail him...his book bustles with the frequently overblown verbal tics of self-development.
-Guardian

Synopsis

So, you think you know Joey Barton. Think again. No Nonsense is a game-changing autobiography which will redefine the most fascinating figure in British football. It is the raw yet redemptive story of a man shaped by rejection and the consequences of his mistakes. He has represented England, and been a pivotal player for Manchester City, Newcastle United, Queens Park Rangers, Marseille, Burnley and now Glasgow Rangers, but his career has featured recurring controversy. The low point of being sent to prison for assault in 2008 proved to be the catalyst for the re-evaluation of his life. No Nonsense reflects Barton's character - it is candid, challenging, entertaining and intelligent. He does not spare himself, in revealing the formative influences of a tough upbringing in Liverpool, and gives a survivor's insight into a game which to use his phrase 'eats people alive'. The book is emotionally driven, and explains how he has redirected his energies since the birth of his children. In addition to dealing with his past, he expands on his plans for the future. The millions who follow his commentaries on social media, and those who witnessed him on BBC's Question Time, will be given another reason to pause, and look beyond the caricature.
 

About Joey Barton

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Published September 22, 2016 by Simon & Schuster Ltd. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Sports & Outdoors.
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Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Alex Clark on Oct 09 2016

Barton is a serial adopter of the fresh start; over the years, he has repeatedly declared himself a new man, wiser, more mature, in control of the destructive impulses that assail him...his book bustles with the frequently overblown verbal tics of self-development.

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