No Pretty Pictures by Anita Lobel
A Child of War (National Book Award Finalist)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

The beloved Caldecott Honor artist now recounts a tale of vastly different kind -- her own achingly potent memoir of a childhood of flight, imprisonment, and uncommon bravery in Nazi-occupied Poland. Anita Lobel was barely five when the war began and sixteen by the time she came to America from Sweden, where she had been sent to recover at the end of the war. This haunting book, illustrated with the author's archival photographs, is the remarkable account of her life during those years. Poised, forthright, and always ready to embrace life, Anita Lobel is the main character in the most personal story she will ever tell.The beloved Caldecott Honor artist now recounts a tale of vastly different kind -- her own achingly potent memoir of a childhood of flight, imprisonment, and uncommon bravery in Nazi-occupied Poland. Anita Lobel was barely five when the war began and sixteen by the time she came to America from Sweden, where she had been sent to recover at the end of the war. This haunting book, illustrated with the author's archival photographs, is the remarkable account of her life during those years.Poised, forthright, and always ready to embrace life, Anita Lobel is the main character in the most personal story she will ever tell.

00-01 Tayshas High School Reading List

 

About Anita Lobel

See more books from this Author
Anita Lobel (née Kempler) was born on June 2, 1934. She is a Polish-American illustrator of children's books, including A New Coat for Anna, This Quiet Lady, Alison's Zinnia, and On Market Street, which won a Caldecott Honor for illustrations. One Lighthouse, One Moon, one of two books she created about her cat, Nini, is a New York Times Best Illustrated Book. Her childhood memoir, No Pretty Pictures, was a finalist for the National Book Award. Lobel was born in Krakow, Poland. She was forced to hide in a convent during WWII, but was captured by the Nazis. She and her brother were forced to go into a concentration camp in Germany; they were rescued in 1945 by the Swedish Red Cross. They were lucky to be reunited with their parents in 1947. In 1952, her family moved to New York, and she then attended Pratt Institute for Art. Lobel graduated with a B. F. A. in Fine Arts. Lobel met her husband, Arnold, at Pratt while acting in a play. Anita's major works include: Alison's Zinnias, Sven's Bridge, On Market Street, and One Lighthouse, One Moon. She has been nominated for numerous awards including selections for the Best Illustrated Book from New York Times Book Reviews (Sven's Bridge, On Market Street and One Lighthouse, One Moon). On Market Street also received a Caldecott Honor Book Award, a Boston Globe/Horn Book Award (illustration), and is an American Book Award finalist.
 
Published September 17, 1998 by Greenwillow. 208 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, War, Children's Books, Education & Reference, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for No Pretty Pictures

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

A haunting look back by Lobel, a Polish Jew who “was born far, far away, on a bloody continent at a terrible time.” Lobel writes of her life as a young girl, who “was barely five years old when the war began.” She and her three-year-old brother did not understand when her father disappeared in 19...

| Read Full Review of No Pretty Pictures: A Child o...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Few admirers of Lobel's sunny picture book art (On Market Street) would guess at the terrors of Lobel's own childhood.

| Read Full Review of No Pretty Pictures: A Child o...

Reader Rating for No Pretty Pictures
92%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 41 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review