Notes From the Mothership The Naked Invisibles by Adrienne Zurub

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Synopsis

Notes is the Shawshank Redemption of this multi-faceted, grown woman, registered nurse, subject not object, one, Adrienne Zurub! (Though not centered on any murderous wrongdoing! Intent? Well...Maybe) Everything that is important is invisible is a quote within the book that buttresses the impetus and prevailing themes within this book and its stories. Themes of invisibility, self-negation, obsession, and sexism amongst others (patient advocacy, stand up comedy, theater, etc.) are played out, and evolved in the axis of cardiothoracic surgery, at a world renowned open heart facility. Essentially and philosophically we choose our respective battlegrounds. It is no coincidence, maybe divine intervention, or fate if you will, that Ms. Zurub plays out her existential search for self, identity, and the definition of herself in her worlds, and others, in a surgical setting; whereby the diseased and the cancerous are excised routinely, and arteries are bypassed. Notes effectively parallels the authors mission in excising layers of self doubt, perceptions of inferiority, invisibility, and longing. Notes gratefully distances itself from the vertiginous television sitcom vision of OR s, surgeons, nurses. Within this insular environment where the masking procedure is ritualistically performed to protect oneself, this masking also serves as the book demonstrates with loud and quiet attention, to allow its denizens to hide from the foibles and weaknesses of themselves, Ms. Zurub included. The authors ability to read people, an innate talent she possessed as a child is heighten in this covert setting. The journey of Adrienne Zurub suggests a more urbane provenance than her as an eleven year-old grrl with incredible ambition, the oldest of nine children, in a small junk room, in a modest home on a village of a street in Cleveland, Ohio. As this precocious child, she uses collages, hung on the wall at the end of her bed, to bring the disparate elements of her life together as well as serving as a talisman to her future selves. You re too stupid to forage for food! Did the nerve gas get to you!! These are expressions you would expect to hear on dirty urban streets, yet these insults and others marked the environment that Adrienne Zurub, as a registered nurse on the prestigious Cleveland Clinic open heart team, heard sprinkled freely in regards to her nursing colleagues (both male and female), residents, and anyone who drew the wrath of angry surgeons! Yet, this book is not about angry surgeons. 'Notes' multi-dimensional, multi-functional force is that it delivers insider patient information and advice in its patient advocacy role. It inspires with poignant patient stories and stories of the incredibly average persons who make up this accomplished team. And, Notes the long awaited ,baby of Adrienne Zurub, is a revealing nonfiction work detailing with wit, poignancy and stark attention her very personal search for identity, validation, and self within the context of her world and this environment. The author s seeking, longing, and connections are most human, and we as readers are privy to the deeply personal without the stench of voyeurism. It becomes safe shared learning from the vantage point of close proximity. 'Notes' utilizes the expressions of spoken word pOetry, stand up comedy, and wrenching storytelling, to afford the reader a ride into a world of pathos, collecting the talismans of relationships along those journeys. The spoken word format adds a staccato rhythm to the work and augments the Faulknerian stream of consciousness of the book. We learn of the lowliness of...
 

About Adrienne Zurub

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Published January 25, 2008 by Chase & Wunderlick Publishers, LLC. 224 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs.

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