Notes on Nursing by Florence Nightingale
What it is, and what it is not

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Synopsis

First published in 1859, "Notes on Nursing" was written by the innovative female nurse Florence Nightingale, the woman responsible for improving hospital conditions in war-torn Crimea. Though relatively short, this work is entirely comprised of nursing hints designed to aid individuals entrusted with the health care of others. The advice Nightingale wrote of included such practicalities as the ventilation, heating, noise, light, bedding, and cleanliness of the invalid's environment, as well as a nurse's personal cleanliness and methods of observation. This work also addresses the treatment of the individuals being nursed, from the food they consume to the things they should or should not be told. Though the author herself stressed the fledgling nature of her guide, Nightingale's effort to systematize the care of the unhealthy has since earned her recognition as one of the world's founders of modern nursing.
 

About Florence Nightingale

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Born in Florence, Italy, of wealthy parents, Florence Nightingale was a British nurse who is regarded as the founder of modern nursing practice. She was a strong proponent of hospital reform and has been the subject of more than 100 biographies and many magazine pieces. As a young woman in the early nineteenth century, she had limited opportunity for a career. But Nightingale was very intelligent, and had extraordinary organizational capacities. She probably chose to become a nurse because of her great need to serve humanity. She was trained in Germany at the Institute of Protestant Deaconesses in Kaiserswerth, which had a program for patient care training and for hospital administration. Nightingale excelled at both. As a nurse and then administrator of a barracks hospital during the Crimean War, she introduced sweeping changes in sanitary methods and discipline that dramatically reduced mortality rates. Her efforts changed British military nursing during the late nineteenth century. Following her military career, she was asked to form a training program for nurses at King's College and St. Thomas Hospital in London. The remainder of her career was devoted to nurse education and to the documentation of the first code for nursing. Her 1859 book, Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not has been described as "one of the seminal works of the modern world." The work went through many editions and remains in print today. Using a commonsense approach and a clear basic writing style, she proposed a thorough regimen for nursing care in hospitals and homes. She also provided advice on foods for various illnesses, cleanliness, personal grooming, ventilation, and special notes about the care of children and pregnant women.
 
Published April 15, 2007 by Cosimo Classics. 144 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Literature & Fiction, Professional & Technical, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Education & Reference, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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