Odd Corners by William Hjortsberg
The Slip-Stream World of William Hjortsberg

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In 1971, when William Hjortsberg first published Gray Matters, reviewers mentioned Borges. And in 1972 came Symbiography, a novella about a man who dreams for a living. He is, in fact, a best-selling dreamer. Before "Mad Max" (1979) and Neuromancer (1984), back in the days when reality was either "real" or chemical, Hjortsberg sat about to create a post-holocaust fiction, (mis-termed, we think, "science" fiction), that anticipates the Virtual, the Punk, and the Meta. In The New York Times, John Leonard called him "a satanic S.J. Perelman . . . by way of Disney and de Sade," and Harry Crews, also in The Times, continued, "He writes fiction the way Leroy Jordan plays football—with controlled abandon—which is to say, with the abandon that only the greatest discipline can release."

As readers it is thrilling to realize how perfectly timed this work is for our day, fresher even, somehow, than it was thirty years ago. Odd Corners collects Gray Matters and Symbiography together with two stories never before in book form, a complete cyberworld, courtesy of William Hjorstberg.

About William Hjortsberg

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William Hjortsberg (b. 1941) is an acclaimed author of novels and screenplays. Born in New York City, Hjortsberg's first success came with Alp (1969), an offbeat story of an Alpine skiing village, which Hjortsberg's friend Thomas McGuane called, "quite possibly the finest comic novel written in America." In the 1970s, Hjortsberg wrote two science fiction novels, Gray Matters (1971) and Symbiography (1973), as well as Toro! Toro! Toro! (1974), a comic jab at the macho world of bullfighting. His best-known work is Falling Angel (1978), a hard-boiled occult mystery. In 1987 the book was adapted into a film titled Angel Heart, which starred Robert De Niro and Mickey Rourke. Hjortsberg's most recent work is Jubilee Hitchhiker (2012), a biography of Richard Brautigan, American writer and voice of 1960s counterculture.
Published March 30, 2004 by Counterpoint. 256 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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Even though Par lives in a completely automated house and dreams for his living—bringing him a pretty penny from those willing to pay for such things—his house, and the bubble cities inhabited by his clients, is surrounded by the vast wastelands of post-apocalypse America.

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