On The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin
(Csa Word Recordings)

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On the Origin of the Species ranks as one of the most important and influential books ever written, and one that remains as controversial today as upon its initial publication 150 years ago. Here, eminent biologist and staunch Darwinist Richard Dawkins narrates his own expertly abridged version of Darwin's groundbreaking book. In cutting passages that are now proven to be wrong, mostly those dealing with genetics, Dawkins streamlines the book for modern tastes while preserving its sound scientific underpinnings. What's truly remarkable, Dawkins notes, is how much Darwin got right. Remarkable, too, is the clarity of Darwin's prose, which, while necessarily technical in nature, makes the scientific basis for his theory of natural selection accessible to laypeople. For those wavering between creationism and evolution, or for anyone who wants a better understanding of Darwinism, Dawkins' brilliant reading is the perfect entry into a book that truly changed the world.

About Charles Darwin

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Charles Darwin, a Victorian scientist and naturalist, has become one of the most famous figures of science to date. Born in 1809 to an upper-middle-class medical family, he was destined for a career in either medicine or the Anglican Church. However, he never completed his medical education and his future changed entirely in 1831 when he joined HMS Beagle as a self-financing, independent naturalist. On returning to England in 1836 he began to write up his theories and observations which culminated in a series of books, most famously On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection in 1859, where he challenged and contradicted contemporary biological and religious beliefs with two decades worth of scientific investigation and theory. Darwin's theory of natural selection is now the most widely accepted scientific model of how species evolve. He died in 1882 and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Damien Hirst is an internationally renowned English artist, who has dominated the art scene in England since the 1990s. Known in particular for his series of works on death, Hirst here provides a contemporary, visual take on Darwin's theory of evolution - the struggle between life and death in nature. William Bynum is Professor Emeritus of the History of Medicine at University College, London, and was for many years Head of the Academic Unit of the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. He edited the scholarly journal Medical History from 1980 to 2001, and his previous publications include Science and the Practice of Medicine in the Nineteenth Century; The Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine (co-edited with Roy Porter); The Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (with Roy Porter), The Dictionary of Medical Biography (with Helen Bynum), and History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction. He lives in Suffolk.
Published November 23, 2006 by CSA Word. 1 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Literature & Fiction, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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