Once Upon a Car by Bill Vlasic
The Fall and Resurrection of America's Big Three Automakers--GM, Ford, and Chrysler

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Synopsis

Once Upon a Car is the fascinating epic story of the rise, fall, and rebirth of the Big Three U.S. automakers, General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler. Written by Bill Vlasic, the Detroit bureau chief for the New York Times and acclaimed author of Taken for a Ride, this eye-opening, richly anecdotal work is more than a riveting and insightful business history. It offers a clear-eyed view of the present day automobile industry and of Detroit, the city that spawned it, going far beyond the corporate and federal maneuverings to explore the impact the car companies’ failures have had on the overall economy, and more importantly what they have done to people’s lives.  Relevant and thought-provoking, Once Upon a Car is an unforgettable journey deep inside this quintessentially American industry.
 

About Bill Vlasic

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Bill Vlasic is an award-winning business reporter with more than fifteen years of experience specializing in the automotive industry. He is currently the Detroit bureau chief for the New York Times. He previously worked as a reporter for the Detroit News and as a correspondent for BusinessWeek. He is also the coauthor of Taken for a Ride, about the ill-fated 1998 merger between Daimler-Benz and Chrysler. Vlasic is a winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for excellence in financial journalism and has been recognized for his reporting and investigative journalism by the Associated Press and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. He lives near Detroit, Michigan.
 
Published October 4, 2011 by William Morrow. 416 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, History, Political & Social Sciences, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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On that latter point, Vlasic’s account opens with an unlikely moment in automotive history—namely, Ford’s wooing of Jim Farley, who had been working at Toyota, steadily raising the foreign automaker’s presence in the U.S. and pushing the Scion to hipsters, making Toyota dealerships “cool, pressur...

Sep 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Once Upon a Car: The Fall and...

The Wall Street Journal

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A "jobs bank," we learn, is a euphemism for the rainy-day "holding bin for excess workers," as Mr. Vlasic calls it, negotiated by the United Auto Workers in 1984, when no one had any idea about the rainy days that lay ahead.

Nov 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Once Upon a Car: The Fall and...

Los Angeles Times

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New book by veteran Detroit automotive beat reporter Bill Vlasic traces the story of the U.S. carmakers from the first inklings of trouble in 2006 to GM's and Chrysler's government-bankrolled bankruptcy reorganizations in 2009.

Dec 11 2011 | Read Full Review of Once Upon a Car: The Fall and...

Washington Independent Review of Books

When a strike occurred at an assembly plant, GM executives actually calculated that this strike helped the bottom line by preventing GM from producing more loss-making cars.

Sep 23 2011 | Read Full Review of Once Upon a Car: The Fall and...

Portland Book Review

Mulally’s forward thinking ensured that the Ford Motor Company would survive without bail-out funds, while Wagoner was the CEO who lost $45 billion for General Motors (GM) in just 15 months.

Apr 27 2012 | Read Full Review of Once Upon a Car: The Fall and...

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