Ottoline Morrell by Miranda Seymour
Life on the Grand Scale

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Synopsis

Chronicles the life of Ottoline Morrell, the celebrated patron of British literary society in the Bloomsbury era who became the inspiration for numerous literary characters, including Hermione Roddice in D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love.
 

About Miranda Seymour

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Miranda Seymour is the author of many acclaimed and bestselling works of fiction and nonfiction, including biographies of Mary Shelley, Robert Graves, Henry James, and, most recently, the pioneer French racing driver HellE Nice. She lives in England.
 
Published October 1, 1992 by Hodder & Stoughton Ltd. 432 pages
Genres: History, Travel, Biographies & Memoirs. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Ottoline Morrell

Kirkus Reviews

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Over six feet tall with red hair and a taste for wearing bizarre costumes, Morrell was an easy mark for parody, but as Lawrence--who in Women in Love offered the most painful one--said, she ``moved men's imaginations.'' And her range was encompassing: She could enjoy a Henry James or Joseph Conra...

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Publishers Weekly

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Admitting to great admiration for her subject, Seymour ( Ring of Conspirators: Henry James and His Circle ) has nonetheless written a fully realized study of Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938), famed British patron of the arts.

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The Independent

It's the remarks of Virginia Woolf - and Bertrand Russell, Augustus John, Aldous Huxley, Lytton Strachey, D H Lawrence et al - that made Ottoline famous.

Oct 04 1992 | Read Full Review of Ottoline Morrell: Life on the...

The Independent

Women fell constantly and hopelessly in love with Ottoline all her life, from the stout and lively young art historian Maud Cruttwell, who wrote her 60 adoring letters in 1899, to the extravagantly stormy old composer Dame Ethel Smyth in 1933 who told Philip simply 'I worshipped her'.

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