Paradime by Alan Glynn
A Novel

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Part of what drives the energy in this tale is that Glynn, as before, gives us a character already at the limits of his emotional resilience, on edge and out of grit. And that is where the fun begins.
-NY Journal of Books

Synopsis

From Alan Glynn, the award-winning author of Limitless, comes a novel of a twenty-first-century identity crisis that will thrill you from page one.

Danny Lynch didn’t sign up for this, but right now, it’s all he’s got. Three weeks ago, he was working at a chow hall in Afghanistan and—more or less—doing fine. Sure, this meant living in a war zone, but he was never in the line of fire and, frankly, the money was hard to resist. Then Danny saw something he shouldn’t have, and now he’s back in New York City, haunted by what sent him home and lucky to be employed at all, even if that means dicing carrots for ten hours a day in a stuffy Midtown restaurant. The job’s one saving grace? A sight line from his prep station in the kitchen to a coveted corner table in the main room. For Danny, this is a window into the lives of some of Barcadero’s flashy clientele—and one evening, he sees a man who looks exactly like him.

Teddy Trager is the visionary founder of the billion-dollar investment firm Paradime Capital. He has everything Danny never knew he wanted—cashmere suits, a sleek sports car . . . privilege, power—and the closer Danny looks at Trager the more fixated he becomes.

 

About Alan Glynn

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Alan Glynn is a graduate of Trinity College. His first novel, The Dark Fields, was released in March 2011 as the movie Limitless by Relativity Media. He is also the author of Winterland.
 
Published August 2, 2016 by Picador. 272 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Crime. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Paradime
All: 4 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Above average
on May 17 2016

The plot keeps moving with plenty of effective surprises, and the final chapters successfully navigate to an even darker tone. So the not-quite-resolved ending seems perfectly appropriate, even if you have to read it over to make sense of it.

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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Charlie Rubin on Jul 27 2016

...we yearn for it all to pull together in some satisfyingly unconventional way. That yearning is mostly futile. Still, at the book’s most evocative, Danny/Teddy symbolizes our fears and shimmering unfulfilled wishes about roads not taken..

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NY Journal of Books

Good
Reviewed by Richard Cytowic on Aug 31 2016

Part of what drives the energy in this tale is that Glynn, as before, gives us a character already at the limits of his emotional resilience, on edge and out of grit. And that is where the fun begins.

Read Full Review of Paradime: A Novel | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

Blog Critics

Above average
Reviewed by Jack Goodstein on Jul 25 2016

If he is not quite a villain hero, he is, more often than not, quite unsympathetic. Readers unable to buy into him and his emotions, his state of mind, are not likely to buy into his story. Still, he is drawn with shading sufficient to make the sale.

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