Passchendaele by Nick Lloyd
A New History

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The German army’s terrible suffering is duly explored, as well as that of Canadian and Anzac infantrymen. Published on the eve of Passchendaele’s 100th anniversary, the book is harrowing but necessary.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Between July and November 1917, in a small corner of Belgium, more than 500,000 men were killed or maimed, gassed or drowned - and many of the bodies were never found. The Ypres offensive represents the modern impression of the First World War: splintered trees, water-filled craters, muddy shell-holes. The climax was one of the worst battles of both world wars: Passchendaele. The village fell eventually, only for the whole offensive to be called off. But, as Nick Lloyd shows, notably through previously unexamined German documents, it put the Allies nearer to a major turning point in the war than we have ever imagined.
 

About Nick Lloyd

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Nick Lloyd is Senior Lecturer in Defense Studies at King’s College London. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham and is the author of two previous books, Loos 1915 and The Amritsar Massacre: The Untold Story of One Fateful Day. He lives in Gloucestershire, England.
 
Published May 23, 2017 by Basic Books.
Genres: History, Travel, War. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Passchendaele
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Thomas McClung on May 22 2017

This story, told from both sides but with more emphasis on the British perspective, is as emblematic of the futility of World War I as any other. Yet there is an object lesson to be learned here...

Read Full Review of Passchendaele: A New History | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Ian Thomson on Apr 30 2017

The German army’s terrible suffering is duly explored, as well as that of Canadian and Anzac infantrymen. Published on the eve of Passchendaele’s 100th anniversary, the book is harrowing but necessary.

Read Full Review of Passchendaele: A New History | See more reviews from Guardian

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