Peace Crane by Sheila Hamanaka

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Synopsis

On August 6, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. Out of the ashes grew the legacy of Sadako, the girl who folded a thousand paper cranes. Now Sheila Hamanaka, author and illustrator of the acclaimed All the Color of the Earth, uses majestic oil paintings and heartfelt verse to express the dreams of another child, trapped in the violence of today's world, who wonders if the peace crane will ever come.

Fifty years after the bombing of Hiroshima, this luminous book affirms the true spirit of Sadako and all who believe that peace is possible in our troubled time.

 

About Sheila Hamanaka

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Sheila Hamanaka is an award-winning fine artist whose work has also appeared in "Scholastic" magazines as well as in "Permanent Connections" by Sue Ellen Bridgers and Barbara Campbell's "Taking Care of Yoki." Ms. Hamanaka lives in Tappan, New York.
 
Published August 6, 1995 by HarperCollins. 40 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Travel, War, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Peace Crane

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The African-American narrator of this apostrophic verse has heard the story of Sadako's thousand paper cranes; the crane, traditional Japanese symbol of longevity, represents her hopes for peace, both in her violent urban milieu and the world.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Peace Crane

Publishers Weekly

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Dedicated to the children of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and to all the children everywhere who long for peace, this poem takes its inspiration from the true story of 12-year-old Sadako Sasaki, familia

Jul 31 1995 | Read Full Review of Peace Crane

Publishers Weekly

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Dedicated to the memory of those who perished when atomic bombs fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki half a century ago, this poignant, hardhitting book collects the work of more than 60 noted writers and artists who, mostly through depictions of war, underscore the world's acute need for peace.

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Publishers Weekly

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An African American girl asks, ""If I make a paper peace crane/ from a crisp white paper square,/ if I fold my dreams inside the wings,/ will anybody care?"" Explaining her fears of the shootings on her street, the child confides that Peace Crane came for her in a dream, and together they flew ov...

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