Peter Bagge's Other Stuff by Peter Bagge

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

Bagge’s bright art and warped figures suggest the skewed view of a master satirist. This collection serves as a good sampler for those not already familiar with Bagge’s masterful “Buddy Bradley” saga.
-Publishers Weekly


Peter Bagge’s one-offs, with an all-star cast of cartoonist collaborators such as Alan Moore, Robert Crumb, Daniel Clowes, and Adrian Tomine.

During the 1990s and 2000s, Peter Bagge worked mostly on his “Buddy Bradley” stories in Hate and a series of standalone graphic novels (Apocalypse Nerd), but in between these major projects this ever-energetic cartoonist also cranked out dozens of shorter stories, which are now finally being collected in this riotously anarchic book. Peter Bagge’s Other Stuff includes a few lesser-known Bagge characters, including the wacky modern party girl “Lovey” and the aging bobo “Shut-Ins” ― not to mention the self-explanatory “Rock ’N’ Roll Dad” starring Murry Wilson and the Beach Boys. But many of the strips are one-off gags or short stories, often with a contemporary satirical slant, including on-site reportage like “So Much Comedy, So Little Time” (from a comedy festival) and more. Also: Dick Cheney, The Matrix, and Alien! Other Stuff also includes a series of Bagge=written stories drawn by other cartoonists, including “Life in these United States” with Daniel Clowes, “Shamrock Squid” with Adrian Tomine, and the one-two parody punch of “Caffy” (with art by R. Crumb) and “Dildobert” (with art by Prison Pit’s Johnny Ryan)... plus a highlight of the book, the hilarious, literate and intricate exposé of “Kool-Aid Man” written by Alan Moore and drawn by Bagge. (Other collaborators include the Hernandez Brothers and Danny Hellman.) Bagge is one of the funniest cartoonists of the century (20th or 21st), and this collection shows him at his most free-wheeling and craziest... 50 times over. Yes

About Peter Bagge

See more books from this Author
Peter Bagge is the internationally acclaimed creator of Hate and Buddy Bradley ; he lives in Seattle, WA. Robert Crumb was born in Philadelphia on Aug. 30, 1943. In 1962 Crumb got his first real job as an illustrator at American Greetings in Cleveland. The tedious work had him on the brink of quitting until he was promoted to the role of illustrator for the slightly edgier Hi-Brow line. After sending an early Fritz the Cat cartoon to Kurtzman at Help! magazine, Crumb received the following note from him: "We really liked the cat cartoon, but we're not sure how we can print it and stay out of jail." But print it they did. Soon Crumb was working as Kurtzman's assistant at the short-lived Help! The turning point in Crumb's career came in 1965, when he took some LSD. He stopped writing his characters from life and created his most inspired character, Mr. Natural. Zap Comics, consisting entirely of Crumb art, debuted in 1967, with Crumb and his wife selling the first issue on San Francisco street corners. Underground comics are now remembered as an indispensable part of the era, but it was Zap that blazed the trail. Crumb's rambling, hallucinogenic, sexually explicit cartoons became the visual expression of the Haight-Ashbury scene. Particularly memorable was his "Keep on Truckin" image. Keep on Truckin', along with Fritz the Cat and his cover art for Big Brother and the Holding Company's "Cheap Thrills" album, helped make Crumb famous, an icon of the hippie scene. By late 1969 Crumb had joined with S. Clay Wilson, Victor Moscoso, Rick Griffin, Gilbert Shelton, Spain Rodriguez and Robert Williams to create the seven-member Zap Collective, which published copies of the magazine sporadically for the next two decades. Crumb also turned out voluminous work in publications with titles like "Weirdo," "Black and White," "Big Ass Comics" and "People's Comics," in which he killed off Fritz the Cat in 1972, whom he came to despise. Daniel Clowes was born in Chicago in 1961. His comic-book series Eightball is in its tenth year, and his work has appeared in Esquire, The New Yorker, Entertainment Weekly, and Newsweek. A feature film based on Ghost World, his second book is currently in production in Hollywood. He lives in Berkeley, California. Alan Moore is widely considered to be the greatest comic book writer of all time. With over thirty years dedicated to the medium, his body of work includes Watchmen (the best-selling graphic novel in history), From Hell, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Neonomicon, Swamp Thing, Tom Strong, Promethea, V for Vendetta, and Lost Girls, just to name a few. Avatar Press has published numerous Moore projects in recent years, including his seminal guide to graphic storytelling, Writing for Comics. Johnny Ryan lives in Los Angeles, CA, with his wife and his daughter, where he creates the ongoing Angry Youth Comix series. His books include The Comic Book Holocaust , Johnny Ryan's XXX Scumbag Party , The Klassic Komics Klub , What're You Lookin' At?! , Portajohnny , two books (so far) in the Prison Pit series, and four books ( Blecky Yuckerella , Back in Bleck , Comics Are for Idiots , "Fuc- --u, -ss --le" ) in the Blecky Yuckerella series.
Published May 17, 2013 by Fantagraphics. 136 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Peter Bagge's Other Stuff
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Publishers Weekly

on Apr 29 2013

Bagge’s bright art and warped figures suggest the skewed view of a master satirist. This collection serves as a good sampler for those not already familiar with Bagge’s masterful “Buddy Bradley” saga.

Read Full Review of Peter Bagge's Other Stuff | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Rate this book!

Add Review