Plato's Republic by Simon Blackburn
A Biography (Books That Changed the World)

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Synopsis

Plato is perhaps the most significant philosopher who ever lived and The Republic, composed in Athens in about 375 BC, is widely regarded as his most famous dialogue. Its discussion of the perfect city--and the perfect mind--laid the foundations for Western culture and has been the cornerstone of Western philosophy. As the distinguished Cambridge professor Simon Blackburn points out, it has probably sustained more commentary, and been subject to more radical and impassioned disagreement, than almost any other text in the modern world. “A clear and accessible introduction to philosophy’s first superstar” (Kirkus Reviews), Plato’s Republic explores the judicial, moral, and political ideas in the Republic with dazzling insight. Blackburn also examines Republic’s influence and staying power, and shows why, from St. Augustine to twentieth-century philosophers such as Ludwig Wittgenstein, Western thought is still conditioned by this most important, and contemporary, of books.
 

About Simon Blackburn

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Simon R. Blackburn studied in Bristol and Oxford, following which he rose through the ranks at Royal Holloway, initially as a Research Assistant and EPSRC Advanced Fellow (working on various aspects of cryptography) and then as a Reader and Professor. He is a member of the BSHM, IACR, IEEE and LMS, an associate member of the AMS, and a Fellow of the ICA and IMA. His research involves combinatorics, cryptography, communication theory, algebra and the connections between them.
 
Published April 22, 2008 by Grove Press. 196 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction

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