Poetic Artifice by Veronica Forrest-Thomson
A Theory of Twentieth-Century Poetry

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

Poetic Artifice ends with a reading of Sylvia Plath’s “Purdah” and its mysterious “cloak of holes”. A critical landscape lacking Forrest-Thomson could only be a gapped and ragged thing. The reprint of this bracing study is a welcome and important event.
-Guardian

Synopsis

First published posthumously in 1978 by Manchester University Press, this volume turned sharply against critics of the previous generation, notably William Empson, and against emergent strains of historicism. The book is an exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) defence of "all the rhythmic, phonetic, verbal, and logical devices which make poetry different from prose." According to the author, such devices are responsible for poetry's most significant effect-not pleasure or ornament or some kind of special expressivity, but the production of "alternative imaginary orders."
 

About Veronica Forrest-Thomson

See more books from this Author
 
Published April 29, 2016 by Shearsman Books. 238 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Poetic Artifice
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by David Wheatley on Sep 02 2016

Poetic Artifice ends with a reading of Sylvia Plath’s “Purdah” and its mysterious “cloak of holes”. A critical landscape lacking Forrest-Thomson could only be a gapped and ragged thing. The reprint of this bracing study is a welcome and important event.

Read Full Review of Poetic Artifice: A Theory of ... | See more reviews from Guardian