Poetry by Edgar Allan Poe
The Ultimate Edgar Allan Poe

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 9 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

Resonant with themes of love, loneliness, and death, the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe continues to appeal to modern readers more than 150 years later. Spanning the breadth of Poe’s career, this collection of poetry follows the master from his early works through to poetical achievements such as “The Raven” and “Annabel Lee.” One of the best-known American writers, Edgar Allan Poe’s poetry influenced the American Romantic and French Symbolist movements in the 19th century.

HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

 

About Edgar Allan Poe

See more books from this Author
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American writer, poet, and critic.  Best known for his macabre prose work, including the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart,” his writing has influenced literature in the United States and around the world. Visit him online at madcreator.com Avi is the author of more than fifty books for children and young adults, including the 2003 Newbery medal winner Crispin: The Cross of Lead. He has won two Newbery Honors and many other awards for his fiction. He lives with his family in Denver, Colorado. Visit him at Avi-Writer.com.
 
Published April 17, 2012 by HarperPerennial Classics. 500 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Poetry

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Others are more serious, such as Tracie Vaughn Zimmer’s graceful tribute to an indoor centipede—“a ballet of legs / gliding / skating / skimming / across the stage of white porcelain”—and David McCord’s elegiac “Cocoon.” All are placed on or next to page after page of riveting wildlife portraits ...

Jul 26 2012 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

This anthology of American poetry gives great weight to writers born since 1940.

Apr 16 2006 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Reviews of books by R. M. Ryan, Erika Meitner, Matthew Zapruder, Melissa Stein, Nathalie Handal and Atsuro Riley.

Oct 18 2010 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

Examiner

This kind of writing, which is on track toward the mystical, can “leap beyond ordinary human values, into sudden perception of universal values.” Whether or not you agree with Wilson’s premise or definitions of the mystical, the passion and intensity with which he writes is worth looking in...

Jan 30 2010 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

Examiner

The Water Bulls is as seasoned as a book of poetry can be.

Nov 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

Examiner

The following is a list of some of my favorite poems from this collection: William Shakespeare’s Sonnet CXVI (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds”) Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kiss’d Me” Lord Byron’s “She Walks in Beauty” and “The Destruction of Sennachrerib” You can find 100 Best-Loved Poems ...

Jan 04 2011 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

ForeWord Reviews

Together the editors have assembled a body of essays directed toward active teaching professionals at the university level who are looking to reinvigorate their teaching syllabi in survey courses, specialty period courses, and classes in American poetry.

Nov 30 2007 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

Grasping For The Wind

Teachers need look no further for good, relevant poems for their classrooms, and parents who love poetry could share a special moment over some of the same poets that made them love poetry with their own children.

Apr 22 2010 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

http://www.lareviewofbooks.org

At the tax office they were sent to floors that didn’t exist, then waited in more lines for more stamps — this time, inexplicable multitudes of stamps which would eventually be plastered to important documents then ink-stamped by angry civil servants.

May 10 2013 | Read Full Review of Poetry: The Ultimate Edgar Al...

Rate this book!

Add Review
×