Pop Internationalism by Paul Krugman

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Synopsis

"Pop internationalists" -- people who speak impressively about international trade
while ignoring basic economics and misusing economic figures are the target of this collection of
Paul Krugman's most recent essays. In the clear, readable, entertaining style that brought acclaim
for his best-selling Age of Diminished Expectations, Krugman explains what real economic analysis
is. He discusses economic terms and measurements, like "value-added" and GDP, in simple language so
that readers can understand how pop internationalists distort, and sometimes contradict, the most
basic truths about world trade.All but two of the essays have previously appeared in such
publications as Foreign Affairs, Scientific American, and the Harvard Business Review. The first
five essays take on exaggerations of foreign competition's effects on the U.S. economy and represent
Krugman's central criticisms of public debate over world trade. The next three essays expose further
distortions of economic theory and include the complete, unaltered, controversial review of Laura
Tyson's Who's Bashing Whom. The third group of essays highlights misconceptions about competition
from less industrialized countries. The concluding essays focus on interesting and legitimate
economic questions, such as the effects of technological change on society.

 

About Paul Krugman

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columnist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2008.
 
Published February 24, 1997 by The MIT Press. 237 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Pop Internationalism

Kirkus Reviews

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Covered in equally iconoclastic fashion are NAFTA (a political rather than a commercial alliance, in the author's convincing opinion), the unsustainable gains logged for Asia's newly industrializing nations, and the reality that technology has a greater impact on job rates than trade.

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Publishers Weekly

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PW hailed these ""stimulating, maverick essays"" from the controversial Stanford economist.

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