Progressive Movement It's Principles and It's Programme by S. J. Duncan-Clark

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 Excerpt: ... in the following sentence from his "Confession of Faith." "Ultimately we desire to use the government to aid as far as can safely be done in helping the industrial tool-users to become in part tool-owners, just as our farmers now are." It is in this direction that economic freedom lies, and only through economic freedom and industrial democracy can the full happiness of all the people be realized. CHAPTER IX Social Wrongs And Remedies: Child Labor "Every child has a right to be well born, well nourished and well protected; to be a child and to have a chance to play. To cheat the child out of its childhood is the greatest wrong that can be committed by society. It were better that its industries should be sunk in the depths of the sea, than that it should build its profits out of the labor of little children." These strong, true words are from the pen of Dr. Batten, secretary of the social Service committee of the Northern Baptist convention. More than 300,000 children, between the ages of ten and fifteen, are employed in the manufacturing and mechanical industries of the United States. Nearly 2,000,000 between the same ages is the total employed in all "gainful occupations," including agriculture, trade and domestic service. Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Illinois lead all the states in the number of children engaged in factory work. The Southern states have the higgest aggregate of child workers, but it is largely swollen by those children who are employed in the fields. It is obvious then that the problem of child labor is not sectional. North as well as South is concerned. It is an evil national in its scope. The importance of this will be noted later when we come to a discussion of remedial measures. I...
 

About S. J. Duncan-Clark

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Published June 1, 1913 by Ams Pr Inc. 318 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences.