Queen of the Conqueror by Tracy Joanne Borman

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The exploits of William, who died in 1087, have been extensively covered by historians, but they've neglected Matilda's accomplishments. Borman's book gives her the attention she deserves as a modern woman in a pre-modern era.
-Huntington News

Synopsis

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Around the year 1049, William, Duke of Normandy and future conqueror of England, raced to the palace of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders. The count’s eldest daughter, Matilda, had refused William’s offer of marriage and publicly denounced him as a bastard. Encountering the young woman, William furiously dragged her to the ground by her hair and beat her mercilessly. Matilda’s outraged father immediately took up arms on his daughter’s behalf. But just a few days later, Baldwin was aghast when Matilda, still recovering from the assault, announced that she would marry none but William, since “he must be a man of great courage and high daring” to have ventured to “come and beat me in my own father’s palace.”
 
Thus began the tempestuous marriage of Matilda of Flanders and William the Conqueror. While William’s exploits and triumphs have been widely chronicled, his consort remains largely overlooked. Now, in her groundbreaking Queen of the Conqueror, acclaimed author and historian Tracy Borman weaves together a comprehensive and illuminating tapestry of this noble woman who stood only four-foot-two and whose role as the first crowned Queen of England had a large and lasting influence on the English monarchy.
 
From a wealth of historical artifacts and documents, Matilda emerges as passionate, steadfast, and wise, yet also utterly ruthless and tenacious in pursuit of her goals, and the only person capable of taming her formidable husband—who, unprecedented for the period, remained staunchly faithful to her. This mother of nine, including four sons who went on to inherit William’s French and English dominions, confounded the traditional views of women in medieval society by seizing the reins of power whenever she had the chance, directing her husband’s policy, and at times flagrantly disobeying his orders.
 
Tracy Borman lays out Matilda’s remarkable story against one of the most fascinating and transformative periods in European history. Stirring, richly detailed, and wholly involving, Queen of the Conqueror reveals not just an extraordinary figure but an iconic woman who shaped generations, and an era that cast the essential framework for the world we know today.

Praise for Queen of the Conqueror
 
“[Tracy Borman] brings to life Queen Matilda’s enormous accomplishments in consolidating early Norman rule. Alongside her warrior husband, William I, Matilda brought legitimacy, a deeper degree of education, diplomatic savvy and artistic and religious flowering to the shared Norman-English throne. Borman . . . the chief executive of Britain’s Heritage Education Trust, fleshes out the personality of this fascinating woman, who set the steely precedent for subsequent English female sovereigns by displaying great longevity and stamina in a rough, paternalistic time. . . . A richly layered treatment of the stormy reign that yielded the incomparable Bayeux Tapestry and the Domesday Book.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“Tracy Borman tells this story with a steady eye and a steady hand, tracing what can be known of Matilda’s part in the events that were to change the course of English history.”—Helen Castor, Literary Review


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Tracy Joanne Borman

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Tracy Borman is the author of Henrietta Howard: King's Mistress, Queen's Servant and Elizabeth's Women: Friends, Rivals, and Foes Who Shaped the Virgin Queen, as well as The Ring and the Crown: A History of Royal Weddings, 1066-2011, which she co-authored with Alison Weir, Kate Williams, and Sarah Gristwood. Borman studied and taught history at the University of Hull and was awarded a Ph.D. in 1997. She has worked for various historic properties and national heritage organizations, including the National Archives and English Heritage. She is now chief executive of the Heritage Education Trust and also works for Historic Royal Palaces. Borman is a regular contributor to history magazines, such as BBC History Magazine, and is a frequent guest on television and radio.
 
Published April 3, 2012 by Bantam. 336 pages
Genres: History, Biographies & Memoirs, Travel. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
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Critic reviews for Queen of the Conqueror
All: 8 | Positive: 7 | Negative: 1

Publishers Weekly

Excellent
Feb 20 2012

While detailing Matilda’s innate strengths, Borman also places her reign in the context of the early Middle Ages, when the education of well-born women was encouraged though motherhood was still their primary duty.

Read Full Review of Queen of the Conqueror | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

Kirkus

Excellent
Feb 15 2012

A richly layered treatment of the stormy reign that yielded the incomparable Bayeux Tapestry and the Domesday Book.

Read Full Review of Queen of the Conqueror | See more reviews from Kirkus

Huntington News

Good
Reviewed by David M. Kinchen on May 10 2012

The exploits of William, who died in 1087, have been extensively covered by historians, but they've neglected Matilda's accomplishments. Borman's book gives her the attention she deserves as a modern woman in a pre-modern era.

Read Full Review of Queen of the Conqueror

Medieval Bookworm

Good
Reviewed by Meghan on Dec 30 2011

Overall, Matilda: Queen of the Conqueror is a truly fascinating book for anyone who is interested in female power just before the High Middle Ages.

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Tudor Book Reviews

Good
Reviewed by Claire Ridgway on Feb 09 2012

Matilda: Queen of the Conqueror is a must read for anyone interested in the Norman Conquest or England’s Queens, or, in fact, anyone who loves strong historical characters. . .

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Harriet's Reviews

Good
Reviewed by Harriet Klausner on Mar 20 2012

. . .historian Tracy Borman provides a great autobiography of an intelligent and strong Middle Age’s woman who was educated like most of the high born females in the era.

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Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian

Good
Reviewed by Carolyn Harris on Apr 24 2012

One of the great strengths of Queen of the Conqueror is its vivid portrayal of court life in eleventh century Europe.

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The History Notes

Below average
Reviewed by Tamara on Nov 02 2011

Borman's attempt to craft a portrait of her heroine is both thorough and thoughtful; but, while the broadest brushstrokes are confidently drawn, the details. . .are a lattice-work of 'would have', 'could have', 'might have' and 'must have'.

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