Rameau's Nephew and First Satire by Denis Diderot
(Oxford World's Classics)

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In Diderot's brilliant and witty dialogue two acquaintances discuss art, music, education and society. A key work of the French Enlightenment, in this sparkling new translation it is paired with Diderot's First Satire, providing context for Rameau's Nephew, the 'second satire'. - ;'unless you know everything, you really know nothing'

Diderot's brilliant and witty dialogue begins with a chance encounter in a Paris caf--eacute--; between two acquaintances. Their talk ranges broadly across art, music, education, and the contemporary scene, as the nephew of composer Rameau, amoral and bohemian, alternately shocks and amuses the moral, bourgeois figure of his interlocutor. Exuberant and highly entertaining, the dialogue exposes the corruption of society in Diderot's characteristic philosophical exploration.

The debates of the French Enlightenment speak to us vividly in this sparkling new translation, which also includes the First Satire , a related work that provides the context for Rameau's Nephew, Diderot's 'second satire'. -

About Denis Diderot

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Denis Diderot was born at Langres in eastern France in 1713, the son of a master cutler. He was originally destined for the Church but rebelled and persuaded his father to allow him to complete his education in Paris, where he graduated in 1732. For ten years Diderot was nominally a law student, but actually led a precarious bohemian but studious existence, eked out with tutoring, hack-writing and translating. His original writing began in 1746 with a number of scientific works setting out the materialist philosophy which he was to hold throughout his life. Along with his editorship of the Encyclopédie (1747-73), he wrote works on mathematics, medicine, the life sciences, economics, drama and painting, two plays and a novel, as well as his Salons (1759-81). His political writings were mainly composed around 1774 for Catherine II, at whose invitation he went to St. Petersburg. Diderot's astonishingly wide range of interests, together with his growing prediliction for the dialogue form, led to the production of his most famous works: D'Alembert's Dream, The Paradox of the Actor, Jacques the Fatalist and Rameau's Nephew. During the latter part of his life Diderot received a generous pension from Catherine II, in return for which he bequeathed her his library and manuscripts. He died in 1784.
Published November 9, 2006 by Oxford University Press, UK. 175 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

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